welfarist


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wel·far·ism

 (wĕl′fâr-ĭz′əm)
n.
The set of policies, practices, and social attitudes associated with a welfare state.

wel′far·ist n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.welfarist - of or relating to a welfare state
liberal - tolerant of change; not bound by authoritarianism, orthodoxy, or tradition
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References in periodicals archive ?
In the second Republic, as the first civilian governor of Lagos state, Jakande presided over a people-oriented, progressive administration that was second to none in Nigeria in the execution of welfarist programmes and in the process, earned himself the sobriquet 'Action Governor.' The highpoint was the faithful implementation of the Unity Party of Nigeria (UPN)'s four cardinal programmes of free education, free health service, full employment and rural development for the benefit of Lagosians.
Trapped in a Vice offers a robust critique of juvenile justice as a persistent systemic investment in reforms that do not address fundamental issues: "punitive practices are essentially repackaged to look nicer, to be more welfarist in their orientation," yet "they remain tied to the carceral state-they are still a form of punishment" (161).
Creating a system that is sensitive to the well-being of all individuals what the University of Chicago's Eric Posner calls the "welfarist approach" quickly runs into the problem of nation-state sovereignty.
Creating a system that is sensitive to the wellbeing of all individuals - what the University of Chicago's Eric Posner calls the "welfarist approach" - quickly runs into the problem of nation-state sovereignty.
On the economy, he is lauded by his supporters for striking that fine balance between growth-oriented policies aimed at 'growing the pie' and the welfarist agenda no government in India can afford to ignore given that over 200 million rural and urban poor who call India home.
This change was characterised by hope that never materialised.Then came the postcolonial period (between 1960's and late 1980's), which was culturally conservative, but welfarist in social-economic orientation.
Posner and Weyl develop a clear vision of what it means to take a welfarist foundation of the market seriously.
He added: "I've always been an animal welfarist. I think you'll probably find a large proportion of the UK population love animals.
On the most common analysis, a welfarist one, the permissibility of selecting for disability depends on the truth of the Neutrality Thesis.
While implicitly still a welfarist, Posner does not directly confront rights on the terrain of ethics; and he is fully an internationalist in the problems to solve.
Even among many Democrats with more Big-Government, welfarist inclinations, it was once not uncommon to find influential politicians who were strongly pro-life (former Pennsylvania governor Bob Casey comes to mind) or pro-gun.
The result was a battle royal between capitalist interests intent on "flat," universal rules of relatively laissez-faire governance and small-business/skilled-worker coalitions active in subnational polities (in big cities and western states) inclined towards a more regulated and welfarist polity.