well-born


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well-born

adj (well born when postpositive)
having been born into a wealthy or upper-class family
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

well-born

[ˌwelˈbɔːn] ADJbien nacido
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Though these heroines were well-born, Gregory says, "they don't all have very well-recorded histories.
You needed to have been well-born, or even if born in disadvantage, to have won a lottery of sorts that got you to a good school or landed you at the doorsteps of a Western charity of some scholarship-giving Mzungu religious order.
In fact, he has been busily falling in love with Viola de Lesseps, a well-born girl who wants to be an actor (at a time when women were not allowed on the stage) and who, having turned up at the Globe for an audition dressed as a boy, gets both the part of Juliet and bags the author as well.
Although not a member of the House of Saud, he was well-born and well-connected.
All four Georges had married well-born German ladies, but produced few offspring.
The lads from Liverpool may not have been 'well-born' and educated, but they were true artists, who valued their music and their fans more than all the billions and gazillions they stood to make.
Born in 1550, in the North Wales town of Denbigh, Thomas was one of four brothers, and from an early age his enthusiasm for life seems to have been guided by that Tudor Zeitgeist which motivated the able, well-born young men of the age.
Taffs Well-born, award-winning screenwriter and film director Christopher Monger got in touch from his home in LA.
In Colorado in the 1800s, Jay Cavendish (Smit-McPhee) is a 16 year-old well-born Scot, saved from vicious bounty hunters by Silas Selleck (Fassbender) who agrees to help him find his teenage Scottish love.
Typical was The Standard of Living Among Workingmen's Families in New York City (1909), written by Robert Chapin, the son of a college president, which labeled "visits to cafes, ale houses," tobacco, gambling and lotteries, "ornaments (personal)," "theater and "public festivities," and even candy, soda water, and ice cream for children as "luxuries" and "extravagances." Through the 20th and into the 21st centuries opposition to consumerism remained almost exclusively the domain of well-born do-gooders, often finding its voice in claims that advertisers create in common folk "artificial" desires for "useless" luxuries and "mindless" entertainment.
Ginette Aley explores the homefront through the correspondence of Kathleen Samuels, a well-born Virginian pressed to maintain her home in the face of material shortage and her husband's absence due to military service.
Kate starred in the school production as Eliza Doolittle, a flower girl who took speech lessons so that she could pass as a well-born lady.