well-born


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well-born

adj (well born when postpositive)
having been born into a wealthy or upper-class family
Translations

well-born

[ˌwelˈbɔːn] ADJbien nacido
References in periodicals archive ?
All four Georges had married well-born German ladies, but produced few offspring.
Born in 1550, in the North Wales town of Denbigh, Thomas was one of four brothers, and from an early age his enthusiasm for life seems to have been guided by that Tudor Zeitgeist which motivated the able, well-born young men of the age.
In Colorado in the 1800s, Jay Cavendish (Smit-McPhee) is a 16 year-old well-born Scot, saved from vicious bounty hunters by Silas Selleck (Fassbender) who agrees to help him find his teenage Scottish love.
Through the 20th and into the 21st centuries opposition to consumerism remained almost exclusively the domain of well-born do-gooders, often finding its voice in claims that advertisers create in common folk "artificial" desires for "useless" luxuries and "mindless" entertainment.
Ginette Aley explores the homefront through the correspondence of Kathleen Samuels, a well-born Virginian pressed to maintain her home in the face of material shortage and her husband's absence due to military service.
Kate starred in the school production as Eliza Doolittle, a flower girl who took speech lessons so that she could pass as a well-born lady.
It includes "Coups, Cults & Cannibals," a collection of reportage; "The Rulemakers: How the wealthy and well-born dominate Congress"; and "Pork and other Perks: Corruption and Governance in the Philippines.
Even a well-born dame wouldn't have had the vote unless she was over 30.
He leaves behind Valerie - his Taffs Well-born wife of 56 years - and their three children Ceri, Sian and Gareth.
A well-born WASP with top-drawer social connections (to the Roosevelts, no less) and a cultivated taste for fine art, Alsop cut a far more impressive figure than the braying media asses who currently dominate the political scene.
Like many well-born men with a social conscience," he maintains in one passage, "Roosevelt liked to think that he empathized with the poor.
The young Tolstoy was the archetypal, well-born reprobate--a womaniser and inveterate gambler who received his baptism of fire in the catastrophe of the Crimean War.