well-wrought

Related to well-wrought: wrought-up, wrought out

well-wrought

adj
(well wrought when postpositive) shaped, formed, or decorated with skill
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References in periodicals archive ?
Mary Beth Keane's well-wrought, emotionally affecting third novel, Ask Again, Yes, chronicles the lives of two neighboring working-class families over the course of four decades.
Woodson's Harbor Me takes readers on a journey during which young urban teenagers discover the satisfaction of a well-wrought conversation.
Instead, West, Cohen and editor Carla Gutierrez shrewdly peg their film on Ginsburg's 1993 confirmation hearing before the Senate where senators Joe Biden, Ted Kennedy and even Orrin Hatch grill President Clinton's Supreme Court nominee, and receive a supersized helping of bluntly honest, well-wrought answers.
The authoress's analysis of the infantilization of the male protagonist, in which she asserts that their misfit status is due to their incompatibility with either of the available masculine models, is particularly well-wrought.
With a well-wrought evocation of past events, terrific characterisation, and a truly sinister killer, this is horribly plausible and chillingly entertaining.
Though sometimes bogged down in statistics, essays display the same degree of craftsmanship as the collection's well-wrought poems.
Foremost comprising patterns, shapes, and arrangements, these works collectively strove to stabilize material differences and establish well-wrought unity, while individual paintings simultaneously conveyed restraint and singular invention.
In some cases, a thesis that turns on a well-wrought pun can be an effective rhetorical strategy, as puns convey complex ideas in exactly the economical fashion that academic discourse necessitates.
"Last Week Tonight's" long segments have the kind of thematic unity, intelligent structure and logical crescendos you find in a well-wrought piece of music.
In other words, Trump is a well-wrought fictional character that his public has forgotten is fictional.
The turbulent, contested history for which both of these might serve as synecdoches is a fitting metaphor for the narrative tapestries Seirai Yuichi weaves, for they are of uneven quality and often leave the reader uncomfortable, although this discomfiture is as likely to spring from a well-wrought tale with an unanticipated twist as it is from a story too focused on its own existence as a "piece of art." When they succeed, as "Insects," "Honey," and "Birds" do, these vignettes display the power of memory, trauma, and longing still raw in the generations subsequent to the atomic flash over Nagasaki.
Susan's discoveries on what was a quiet Texas college campus hold far greater ramifications than a single sociopath's intentions, and will involve readers in a growing web of terror and tension that's delightfully well-wrought.