werewolf


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were·wolf

also wer·wolf  (wâr′wo͝olf′, wîr′-, wûr′-)
n.
A person believed to have been transformed into a wolf or to be capable of assuming the form of a wolf.

[Middle English, from Old English werewulf : wer, man; see wī-ro- in Indo-European roots + wulf, wolf; see wolf.]
Word History: The meaning wolf in werewolf is current English; the were is not. Werewulf, "werewolf," occurs only once in Old English, about the year 1000, in the laws of King Canute: "lest the madly ravenous werewolf too savagely tear or devour too much from a godly flock." The wer- or were- in wer(e)wulf means "man"; it is related to Latin vir with the same meaning, the source of virile and virility. Both the Germanic and the Latin words derive from Indo-European *wīro-, "man." Wer- also appears, though much disguised, in the word world. World is first recorded (written wiaralde) in Old English in a charter dated 832; the form worold occurs in Beowulf. The Old English forms come from Germanic *wer-ald-, "were-eld" or "man-age." The transfer of meaning from the age of humans to the place where they live has a parallel in the Latin word saeculum, "age, generation, lifetime," later "world."

werewolf

(ˈwɪəˌwʊlf; ˈwɛə-)
n, pl -wolves
(European Myth & Legend) a person fabled in folklore and superstition to have been changed into a wolf by being bewitched or said to be able to assume wolf form at will
[Old English werewulf, from wer man + wulf wolf; related to Old High German werwolf, Middle Dutch weerwolf]

were•wolf

or wer•wolf

(ˈwɛərˌwʊlf, ˈwɪər-, ˈwɜr-)

n., pl. -wolves (-ˌwʊlvz)
(in folklore) a person who has assumed the form of a wolf.
[before 1000; Middle English werwolf, Old English werwulf=wer man (c. Gothic wair, Latin vir) + wulf wolf; c. Middle Dutch weerwolf, Old High German werwolf]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.werewolf - a monster able to change appearance from human to wolf and back againwerewolf - a monster able to change appearance from human to wolf and back again
mythical creature, mythical monster - a monster renowned in folklore and myth
Translations
vlkodlak
varulv
lupfantomo
licántropolobizónhombre lobo
libahunt
ihmissusi
vukodlak
farkasembervérfarkas
varúlfur
weerwolf
wilkołak
pricolici
vlkolak
varulv

werewolf

[ˈwɪəwʊlf] N (werewolves (pl)) → hombre m lobo

werewolf

[ˈwɛərwʊlf ˈwɪərwʊlf] [werewolves] (pl) nloup-garou m

werewolf

nWerwolf m

werewolf

[ˈwɪəˌwʊlf] n (-wolves (pl)) → licantropo, lupo mannaro (fam)
References in classic literature ?
Greatly perplexed, they consulted the local priest, who told them that their captive was undoubtedly a werewolf and had resumed its human for during the night.
I should like to tell you of Guy of Warwick, of King Horn, of William and the Werewolf, and of many others.
I must say they were not cheering to me, for amongst them were "Ordog"--Satan, "Pokol"--hell, "stregoica"--witch, "vrolok" and "vlkoslak"--both mean the same thing, one being Slovak and the other Servian for something that is either werewolf or vampire.
With countless dangers at every turn a twisted vampire queen, a bloodthirsty Coven, and a power-hungry werewolf king who will stop at nothing to dominate the magical world Emily's courage will be tested.
The Werewolf Academy is a story about werewolves letting themselves becoming known to the public in general and the resulting extremist terrorism against the species.
Claire gets bitten by a werewolf and it's only a matter of time before she turns.
A werewolf called Old Stinker is also believed to roam the nearby Wolds.
To our minds, he is a 'classic' serial killer - but back in medieval times, there was no concept of a serial killer and so the authorities believed he was a werewolf because his crimes were so horrific.
Regular readers of my books will know that a werewolf has been reported in the Speke and Halewood areas for centuries, and many years ago something described as 'half-man, half beast' was hastily interred at Flaybrick Hill Cemetery after causing havoc on Bidston Hill.
"They definitely develop their own identities," says Das, "The trouble begins when they become too much like their prey." In The Devourers , it's the Norse werewolf named Fenrir who creates trouble for him and his companions -- Gevaudan from France and Makedon from Greece -- when he falls for his human prey.
These are precisely the goals of this essay on the literary werewolf tales published in Quebec in the late nineteenth century.
Last week, Argentine President Cristina Fernandez presided over the lighting of Chanukah candles with the Tawil family, whose son Yair was, according to urban legend, prevented from turning into a werewolf when the president adopted him as godson Fernandez adopted the Jewish 21-year-old from a Chabad family as grandson, as part of a superstition turned tradition about werewolves.