werewolfery

werewolfery

(ˈwɛəˌwʊlfərɪ) or

werewolfism

n
(European Myth & Legend) the condition of being a werewolf. See also lycanthropy
References in periodicals archive ?
This is not the case, however, in one of the best-known werewolf tales from French Canada, Honore Beaugrand's "Le Loup-garou" (1892), which bridges the gap between the exclusively male texts discussed above and the one text of our corpus which links werewolfery to sexuality in the form of Pamphile Le May's werewolf bridegroom.
Le May respects the narrative convention of a naive storyteller recounting an "actual" case of werewolfery; "it's the whole truth" ("c'est la pure verite;" 405), claims his native informant, Genevieve Jambette.
We're always up for a bit of werewolfery here at The Brief, so this Benicio Del Toro remake was always going to be a winner for us.
The former examines the werewolf through the lens of disability studies, offering a fruitful approach to the pain of transformation and werewolfery described as a "condition" found, for instance, in the BBC's and the Syfy Network's Being Human series (2009-present/ 2011-present).
Although the number of texts blending science-fiction and fantasy to offer a "rational" or "scientific" explanation for werewolfery has grown, the authors point out the omnipresence of religious motifs in these contemporary texts.