whakairo


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whakairo

(fɑːkɑːiːrɒ)
n
(Crafts) NZ the art of carving
[Māori]
References in periodicals archive ?
Kopua, who was raised in Mangatuna by his elders, specialises in whakairo (carving) and ta moko (tattoo), and shares his knowledge of matauranga Maori within the service's collective.
From a young age, Heramaahina has had a passion for different Maori arts whether it be raranga, whakairo, ta moko and design.
These oral traditions were transmitted across generations using purakau (storytelling), waiata (song), whakairo (carving), raranga (weaving), moteatea (chants), oriori (lullabies) and pepeha (genealogical narrative) (Lee, 2009; Pihama, Te Nana & Cameron et al, 2015; Smith, 2008; Wirihana, 2012).
The iwi have been instrumental in the operation and success of Te Puia and the New Zealand M?ori Arts and Crafts Institute, supporting the retention and development of ahurea and toi M?ori, as well as providing training in whakairo and raranga, Mr Flavell says.
132-33), and materialized in practices and forms of carving, or whakairo. The readings demonstrate the differences between transIndigenous as opposed to pan-indigenous aesthetic interpretation--the latter suggestive of 'a single aesthetic system applicable to all Indigenous cultures in all historical periods' (p.
The tracks are "Te Matipiko", "Never Forget", "Fortuna", "This One Be Killa", "Lullaby", "Within These Walls", "Wahine Whakairo", "Two Minds", "Without You", "Children of Romania", "Reconnect", "Do I Belong", "Ngarraanga", and "Repeat Offender".
Whakairo Tuhonohono Keynote speech, 3rd National Australian Indigenous Education Conference, Ballarat, Victoria.
The family or personal house is not however, in Maori terms, an ultimate state/us symbol since it is at the whare whakairo, the carved meeting house where the ancestral memories are preserved, the whakapapa and stories told, that the novel concludes, leaving the reader to consider the relative significance of each of the character's lives.
The Maori proverb 'He whakatauiki: He toi whakairo, he mana tangata' (where there is artistic excellence, there is human dignity) certainly applies forcefully to both of them.
Subsection 4.1 established learning institutions "for the study and practice of the arts and crafts as known to and practised by the Maori people." On the face of it there is little problem with this, but in relation to whakairo (carving), for example, there have been sweeping changes in the way in which it has been articulated in the thousand years since Maori first came to Aotearoa/New Zealand.