whale oil


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whale oil

n.
A yellowish oil obtained from whale blubber, formerly used in making soap and candles and as a lubricating oil and a fuel for lamps.

whale oil

n
(Elements & Compounds) oil obtained either from the blubber of whales (train oil) or the head of the sperm whale (sperm oil)
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.whale oil - a white to brown oil obtained from whale blubberwhale oil - a white to brown oil obtained from whale blubber; formerly used as an illuminant
animal oil - any oil obtained from animal substances
Translations
زَيْت الحوت
hvalolie
hvallÿsi
balina yağı

whale oil

nolio di balena

whale

(weil) noun
a type of very large mammal that lives in the sea.
killer whale noun
a black and white whale.
ˈwhalebone noun, adjective
(of) a light bendable substance got from the upper jaw of certain whales.
whale oil
oil obtained from the fatty parts of a whale.
have a whale of a time
to enjoy oneself very much.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nevertheless, the confederates were not far behind with the whaling hunt, as they gave a blow to the whale oil's trade, which was concentrated mainly in northern ports.
For the same reason whale oil was used in 19th century: cheap and easily available.
Practically all of the whale could be used in one form or another: whale oil was used for lubricants, soap, candles, margarine and curing leather.
Seth Ray's cooper shop, where barrels were made to supply Nantucket's whale oil trade, stands on the adjacent parcel.
Gas light derived from coal competed with whale oil and turpentine.
* Until 1973, whale oil was used in some car transmissions.
The shift away from products containing whale oil and blubber also worked in their favor.
Demand for whale oil, as industrial lubricants or as fuel for heating and lighting, had driven the growth of the whaling industry by a factor of fourteen since 1816.
Primary and secondary indexing covers mating, the Endangered Species Act, whale oil, and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.
Sanger reveals that the combination of wars in the latter part of the 18th century did much to bolster the market for whale oil and Scotland's involvement in the trade.
Just as the fax gave way to email and whale oil gave way to kerosene, so is coal giving way to cleaner forms of energy.
It was decided to bury the huge blue whale body in hope that its flesh and whale oil would decay and leave the bones for further examination, and eventual display.