whaleman


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whaleman

(ˈweɪlmən)
n, pl -men
(Fishing) another name for whaler1
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The ''Nashville'' star is active with the Whaleman Foundation, an oceanic research and conservation group.
The Whaleman Foundation spokeswoman reportedly uses the stairs and attends Bikram yoga classes in order to stay in shape.
government officials, Hayden Panettiere, the international spokesperson for The Whaleman Foundation and its Save the Whales Again
According to Neutrogena, 68% of the funds will go to the Women's Global Education Project, a charity that supports education; 23% to the Lambi Fund of Haiti, a charity that provides disaster relief; and 9% to the Whaleman Foundation, a charity that works to protect the environment.
Drawing on the article on Jonah by the Scottish Presbyterian John Eadie, which went to great lengths to rationalize the Hebrew prophet's experience of being swallowed by a "great fish," Melville in "Jonah Historically Regarded" parodies such attempts at biblical literalism in Ishmael's ironic attempt to answer the skeptical critique of an experienced Sag Harbor whaleman.
Of the names in this list of whale authors, only those following Owen ever saw living whales; and but one of them was a real professional harpooneer and whaleman.
The couple's public display of affection was repeated on Sunday night when Hayden hosted a benefit for the Whaleman Foundation at Eva Longoria Parker's Beso restaurant.
There is a foundation, called the Whaleman Foundation, to raise awareness about whaling and sea life, how damaging it is and how they are being killed.
It was the whaleman who first broke through the jealous policy of the Spanish crown, touching those colonies; .
Representatives from IMMP, Defenders of Wildlife, Sierra Club Angeles Chapter, El Dorado Audubon, BayKeeper, American Cetacean Society, Whaleman Foundation, Heal the Bay, Stop LFAS, and Council for a Living Ocean, among others, then presented their case.
I remembered a story of a white man--a whaleman too--who, falling among cannibals, had been tattoed by them.
By "humanizing" (a term used by the critic Robert Zoellner) the whale, the chapter threatens to undercut the traditional hunter-prey relationship that a whaleman takes for granted--a process that, as several critics have pointed out, is also at work in Hemingway's short story.