whanau


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whanau

(ˈfɑːnaʊ)
n
(Anthropology & Ethnology) NZ (in Māori societies) a family, esp an extended family
[Māori]
References in periodicals archive ?
They use a marae-based, Maori-specific environment to help young Maori and their whanau engage with the justice system in culturally appropriate ways.
Students are tackling increasing responsibilities, including looking after children and whanau, and making ends meet through paid employment.
Despite this, universities and professional bodies have demonstrated marked variation in the way professional psychology training programmes prepare students and clinicians to work with Maori clients and whanau.
Four local whanau mortgaged their houses to start the business--risking everything on a vision for a better future for their people.
Requiring student participants to recruit and support a whanau member to also quit could boost motivation to participate and to succeed at quitting.
Drawing on taped interviews from the 1980s, done in the course of collaborative research on the whanau in the modern world, Metge, a Pakeha, or non-Maori New Zealander, presents her book focusing on Maori methods of learning and teaching whanau and community, while, at the same time, shedding new light on a neglected period in New Zealand history.
By the time she had obtained her injunction however, James had been buried by his whanau.
Pae ora encourages everyone in the health and disability sector to work collaboratively to provide effective services for Maori using an holistic health framework which has three elements: mauri ora (healthy individuals), whanau ora (healthy families) and wai ora (healthy environments).
Working in partnership with one another and with patients will ensure optimal health and well-being for all patients and whanau in our care.
Here Libby experiences all the messiness of whanau, traditional lore, landscape and healing practices.
By far the most pronounced symptoms of whanau unwellness in Dogside Story can be found in an examination of Te Rua, a young man disabled physically (through the amputation of his leg) and emotionally (through the trauma of losing his same-age cousins), who acts not only as the novel's primary narrator, but whose coming-of-age story becomes the plot line out of which all of the other stories spiral.
This paper was written as part of the project Experiences of Maori SIDS Parents, Caregivers and Whanau, funded by the Health Research Council.