whatsoe'er

whatsoe'er

(ˌwɒtsəʊˈɛə)
adj
a variant form of whatsoever
References in classic literature ?
Generous Prince, This night shall prove the herald of my love, Which is so great that whatsoe'er you ask It will not be denied you.
These gracious words, most royal Carolus, Shall make poor Faustus, to his utmost power, Both love and serve the German Emperor, And lay his life at holy Bruno's feet: For proof whereof, if so your grace be pleas'd, The doctor stands prepar'd by power of art To cast his magic charms, that shall pierce through The ebon gates of ever-burning hell, And hale the stubborn Furies from their caves, To compass whatsoe'er your grace commands.
Speak softly, sir, lest the devil hear you; For Faustus at the court is late arriv'd, And at his heels a thousand Furies wait, To accomplish whatsoe'er the doctor please.
Hast Thou not said that whatsoe'er is done Unto Thy weakest and Thy humblest one Is even done to Thee?
Thus, he should wed the woman he loves most Or needs most, whatsoe'er the love or need-- For he can't wed twice.
Alastor's account of the poet-protagonist's time in "Ethiopia" immediately recalls the archaeological activities of Napoleon's Institute de Caire, enumerating visits to "the eternal Pyramids, / Memphis and Thebes, and whatsoe'er of strange / Sculptured on alabaster obelisk, / Or jasper tomb, or mutilated sphinx, / Dark Ethiopia in her desert hills / Conceals" (11116).