wheedling


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whee·dle

 (wēd′l, hwēd′l)
v. whee·dled, whee·dling, whee·dles
v.tr.
1. To obtain through the use of flattery or guile: a swindler who wheedled my life savings out of me.
2. To persuade or attempt to persuade by flattery or guile; cajole: "They could marry on the fortune Miss Starling had wheedled her employer into leaving her" (W. Somerset Maugham).
v.intr.
To use flattery or cajolery to achieve one's ends.

[Origin unknown.]

whee′dler n.
whee′dling·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wheedling - the act of urging by means of teasing or flattery
enticement, temptation - the act of influencing by exciting hope or desire; "his enticements were shameless"
ingratiation, insinuation - the act of gaining acceptance or affection for yourself by persuasive and subtle blandishments; "she refused to use insinuation in order to gain favor"
Translations

wheedling

[ˈwiːdlɪŋ]
A. ADJmimoso
B. Nmimos mpl, halagos mpl

wheedling

adj tone, voiceschmeichelnd, schmeichlerisch
nSchmeicheln nt

wheedling

[ˈwiːdlɪŋ]
1. adj (voice, tone) → suadente
2. nlusinghe fpl
References in classic literature ?
Imagine to yourselves a little, fat man, much wider than he was long, round and shiny as a ball of butter, with a face beaming like an apple, a little mouth that always smiled, and a voice small and wheedling like that of a cat begging for food.
With bows and smiles, he asked in a wheedling tone:
But as to frightening or bullying, or even wheedling some sort of answer out of Mr.
On the contrary, he was masterful in whatever he did, but he had a trick of whimsical wheedling that Dede found harder to resist than the pleas of a suppliant lover.
It is folly to threaten me, but I'm so kind-hearted that I cannot stand coaxing or wheedling.
And they enslaved you over again - but not frankly, as the true, noble men would do with weight of their own right arms, but secretly, by spidery machinations and by wheedling and cajolery and lies.
It is a roundabout wheedling sort of thing which I should not have credited you with.
Tom's mother entered now, closing the door behind her, and approached her son with all the wheedling and supplication servilities that fear and interest can impart to the words and attitudes of the born slave.
No matter," said D'Artagnan, in his most wheedling tone.
But Eliza Millward says her father intends to call upon her soon, to offer some pastoral advice, which he fears she needs, as, though she is known to have entered the neighbourhood early last week, she did not make her appearance at church on Sunday; and she - Eliza, that is - will beg to accompany him, and is sure she can succeed in wheedling something out of her - you know, Gilbert, she can do anything.
WE'RE getting there" was the slightly wheedling slogan of British Rail adverts in the late 1980s.
I can't for the life of me recall what I handed over to my daughters when they were growing up but then daughters perfect the knack of wheedling money from an early age.