whelk


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whelk 1

(wĕlk, hwĕlk)
n.
Any of various large marine carnivorous snails chiefly of the family Buccinidae, having a pointed spiral shell, especially the edible species Buccinum undatum of the North Atlantic Ocean.

[Middle English welke, whelke, from Old English weoloc; see wel- in Indo-European roots.]

whelk 2

(wĕlk, hwĕlk)
n.
An inflamed swelling, such as a pimple or pustule.

[Middle English whelke, from Old English hwylca; akin to hwelian, to suppurate.]

whelk′y adj.

whelk

(wɛlk)
n
(Animals) any carnivorous marine gastropod mollusc of the family Buccinidae, of coastal waters and intertidal regions, having a strong snail-like shell
[Old English weoloc; related to Middle Dutch willok, Old Norse vil entrails]

whelk

(wɛlk)
n
(Pathology) a raised lesion on the skin; wheal
[Old English hwylca, of obscure origin]
ˈwhelky adj

whelk1

(ʰwɛlk, wɛlk)

n.
any of various medium- to large-sized, spiral-shelled marine gastropods of the family Buccinidae, as Buccinum undatum, used for food.
[before 900; late Middle English, aspirated variant of Middle English welk, Old English weoloc]

whelk2

(ʰwɛlk, wɛlk)

n.
a pimple or pustule.
[before 1000; Middle English whelke, Old English hwylca, hwelca]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.whelk - large marine snail much used as food in Europewhelk - large marine snail much used as food in Europe
whelk - large carnivorous marine gastropods of coastal waters and intertidal regions having a strong snail-like shell
seafood - edible fish (broadly including freshwater fish) or shellfish or roe etc
2.whelk - large carnivorous marine gastropods of coastal waters and intertidal regions having a strong snail-like shell
seasnail - any of several creeping marine gastropods with a spirally coiled shell: whelks; tritons; moon shells; neritids
whelk - large marine snail much used as food in Europe
Verb1.whelk - gather whelk
snail - gather snails; "We went snailing in the summer"

whelk

noun
A ridge or bump raised on the flesh, as by a lash or blow:
Translations

whelk

[welk] Nbuccino m

whelk

hwɛlk ˈwɛlk] nbulot m

whelk

whelk

[wɛlk] n (Zool) → buccino
References in classic literature ?
"As well, by your honour's leave, as a hermit-crab in the shell of a whelk," said Conseil.
Meanwhile, we regret that the grand opening of the whelk stall has once again been postponed until a later date.
Blue Marine Foundation (Blue) is calling for national management of the common whelk, which are not subject to quotas under European Union fisheries rules.
We're always looking at how to make TV simple and affordable for our customers," says company spokesman James Whelk.
2006) and the intertidal whelk Buccinanops globulosus (Avaca et al.
Labour in Wales has proved that it's not fit to run a whelk stall - never mind a country.
Nigel Baker Roath, Cardiff Lazy Labour not fit to run a whelk stall YOUR correspondent Chris Lewis, in a recent letter criticises Welsh Secretary Alun Cairns because his success in getting a "floor" put into the Barnett formula, to protect Welsh Government funding, is not as good as the deal offered to Scotland.
It's not quite over yet, maths fans - Harry Kane, the Whelk of Walthamstow (11/4fav in August), might shell out a hat-trick at home to Leicester, which would be enough to tie the Boot if Mo draws a blank at home to Brighton.
I wouldn't trust a Tory to run a whelk stall, never mind the health of the nation.