whey


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whey

 (wā, hwā)
n.
The watery part of milk that separates from the curds, as in the process of making cheese.

[Middle English, from Old English hwæg.]

whey′ey adj.

whey

(weɪ)
n
(Cookery) the watery liquid that separates from the curd when the milk is clotted, as in making cheese
[Old English hwǣg; related to Middle Low German wei, heie, Dutch hui]
ˈwheyey, ˈwheyish, ˈwheyˌlike adj

whey

(ʰweɪ, weɪ)

n.
(esp. in cheese making) the liquid that separates from the curd in coagulated milk.
[before 900; Middle English wheye, Old English hwǣg, c. Frisian (West) waei, Middle Dutch wey]
whey′ey, adj.

whey

The liquid that separates from the curd when milk is coagulated for cheese-making.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.whey - the serum or watery part of milk that is separated from the curd in making cheesewhey - the serum or watery part of milk that is separated from the curd in making cheese
blood serum, serum - an amber, watery fluid, rich in proteins, that separates out when blood coagulates
2.whey - watery part of milk produced when raw milk sours and coagulates; "Little Miss Muffet sat on a tuffet eating some curds and whey"
dairy product - milk and butter and cheese
Translations
مَصْل اللبَن
syrovátka
valle
hera
savó
mysa
išrūgos
sūkalas
zer
srvátka
kesilmiş sütün suyu

whey

[weɪ] Nsuero m

whey

hweɪ] npetit-lait m

whey

nMolke f

whey

[weɪ] nsiero

whey

(wei) noun
the watery part of milk separated from the curd (the thick part), especially in making cheese.

whey

n suero de leche
References in classic literature ?
It was the usual open-air concert, in an ornamental garden, with wines, beer, milk, whey, grapes, etc.--the whey and the grapes being necessaries of life to certain invalids whom physicians cannot repair, and who only continue to exist by the grace of whey or grapes.
He said that men who had been cured by the other process were easily distinguished from the rest of mankind because they always tilted their heads back, between every two words, and swallowed a swig of imaginary whey. He said it was an impressive thing to observe two men, who had been cured by the two processes, engaged in conversation--said their pauses and accompanying movements were so continuous and regular that a stranger would think himself in the presence of a couple of automatic machines.
This war of independence began every morning before breakfast, when Charity escorted her charge to a neighbouring farmhouse, which supplied the Browns, and where, by his mother's wish, Master Tom went to drink whey before breakfast.
Don Quixote took it, and without perceiving what was in it thrust it down in hot haste upon his head; but as the curds were pressed and squeezed the whey began to run all over his face and beard, whereat he was so startled that he cried out to Sancho:
Tess had not at this hour the curiosity to ask why the present Mr Clare was not made a parson like his brethren, and gradually fell asleep again, the words of her informant coming to her along with the smell of the cheeses in the adjoining cheeseloft, and the measured dripping of the whey from the wrings downstairs.
Whey they were summoned, Sir William lay on the floor unconscious.
They were kept in separate flocks; first there were the hoggets, then the oldest of the younger lambs and lastly the very young ones {80} all kept apart from one another; as for his dairy, all the vessels, bowls, and milk pails into which he milked, were swimming with whey. When they saw all this, my men begged me to let them first steal some cheeses, and make off with them to the ship; they would then return, drive down the lambs and kids, put them on board and sail away with them.
He bled her, and he told me to let her live on whey and water-gruel, and take care she did not throw herself downstairs or out of the window; and then he left: for he had enough to do in the parish, where two or three miles was the ordinary distance between cottage and cottage.
Oh, my friend, whey, think you, did I go so far round, why take so long to tell so simple a thing?
It is true, I sometimes made a shift to catch a rabbit, or bird, by springs made of YAHOO'S hairs; and I often gathered wholesome herbs, which I boiled, and ate as salads with my bread; and now and then, for a rarity, I made a little butter, and drank the whey. I was at first at a great loss for salt, but custom soon reconciled me to the want of it; and I am confident that the frequent use of salt among us is an effect of luxury, and was first introduced only as a provocative to drink, except where it is necessary for preserving flesh in long voyages, or in places remote from great markets; for we observe no animal to be fond of it but man, and as to myself, when I left this country, it was a great while before I could endure the taste of it in anything that I ate.
As soon as we had eaten (and porridge and whey was the best of the good man's diet) he took a grave face and said he had a duty to perform by Mr.
But you'd like a drink o' whey first, p'r'aps; I know you're fond o' whey, as most folks is when they hanna got to crush it out."