whilst


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whilst

 (wīlst, hwīlst)
conj. Chiefly British
While.

[Middle English whilest, alteration of whiles, whiles; see whiles.]

whilst

(waɪlst)
conj
chiefly Brit another word for while1, while2, while3, while4, while5
[C13: from whiles + -t as in amidst]

whilst

(ʰwaɪlst, waɪlst)

conj.
Chiefly Brit. while.
[1325–75; Middle English whilest= whiles + parasitic -t as in amongst, amidst]

whilst

Whilst is a formal word which has the same meaning as 'while'. It is used in both time clauses and concessive clauses.

Her sister had fallen whilst walking in her sleep at night.
Raspberries have a matt, spongy surface whilst blackberries have a taut, shiny skin.

You do not use whilst in conversation, and it is not used in American English..

References in classic literature ?
"Incorruptible!" murmured D'Artagnan; "I am unlucky;" and whilst he was lost in thought Bazin retreated toward the sacristy, and even there he could not think himself safe until he had shut and locked the door behind him.
Whilst he was talking to this lad a horse was brought to the door of Bazin's house.
The unknown asked for a glass of wine, broke off a morsel of bread, and did not stir from the window whilst he ate and drank.
"You know," resumed the unknown, "that my mother and my sister, whilst all this is going on in honor of the King of France, have neither money nor bread; you know that I myself shall be poor and degraded within a fortnight, when all Europe will become acquainted with what you have told me.
A momentary lull had therefore set in whilst the prison was empty, and Rosa availed herself of this favourable moment to come forth from her hiding place, which she also induced her father to leave.
Why should people remain in the jail whilst murder was going on at the Tol-Hek?
A prince does not spend much on colonies, for with little or no expense he can send them out and keep them there, and he offends a minority only of the citizens from whom he takes lands and houses to give them to the new inhabitants; and those whom he offends, remaining poor and scattered, are never able to injure him; whilst the rest being uninjured are easily kept quiet, and at the same time are anxious not to err for fear it should happen to them as it has to those who have been despoiled.
But in maintaining armed men there in place of colonies one spends much more, having to consume on the garrison all the income from the state, so that the acquisition turns into a loss, and many more are exasperated, because the whole state is injured; through the shifting of the garrison up and down all become acquainted with hardship, and all become hostile, and they are enemies who, whilst beaten on their own ground, are yet able to do hurt.
Once in a long time, a man traverses the whole scale, and sees and enjoys the symbol solidly, then also has a clear eye for its beauty, and lastly, whilst he pitches his tent on this sacred volcanic isle of nature, does not offer to build houses and barns thereon,--reverencing the splendor of the God which he sees bursting through each chink and cranny.
"When you arrived here did you not sit down on the ground?" asked the genius, "and did you not take some dates from your wallet, and whilst eating them did not you throw the stones about?"
But we were bound to walk, so we went on, whilst above our heads waved medusae whose umbrellas of opal or rose-pink, escalloped with a band of blue, sheltered us from the rays of the sun and fiery pelagiae, which, in the darkness, would have strewn our path with phosphorescent light.
Fisher Ames expressed the popular security more wisely, when he compared a monarchy and a republic, saying that a monarchy is a merchantman, which sails well, but will sometimes strike on a rock and go to the bottom; whilst a republic is a raft, which would never sink, but then your feet are always in water.