whippletree


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to whippletree: whiffletree

whip·ple·tree

 (wĭp′əl-trē′, hwĭp′-)
n. Upper Northern US

[Perhaps blend of dialectal whippin, whippletree and swingletree.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

whippletree

(ˈwɪpəlˌtriː)
n
(Horse Training, Riding & Manège) another name for swingletree
[C18: apparently from whip]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

whif•fle•tree

(ˈʰwɪf əlˌtri, ˈwɪf-)

n.
Northern U.S. a crossbar, pivoted at the middle, to which the traces of a harness are fastened for pulling a vehicle or a plow. Also called whippletree , singletree.
[1820–30; variant of whippletree]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.whippletree - a crossbar that is attached to the traces of a draft horse and to the vehicle or implement that the horse is pullingwhippletree - a crossbar that is attached to the traces of a draft horse and to the vehicle or implement that the horse is pulling
crossbar - a horizontal bar that goes across something
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
TRADITIONAL These blades use a divided arm arrangement, cannily named a 'whippletree' to apply even pressure across the whole of the blade.
In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in his memory to the Boston Marathon Jimmy Fund Walk, c/o Joni's Angels, 31 Whippletree Road, Chelmsford, MA 01824.
IN OLIVER WENDELL HOLMES' poem, "The Deacon's Masterpiece," a clever craftsman builds a carriage meant to last 100 years, with each component selected because it is exactly as durable as the next: "The floor was just as strong as the sills," the poet intones, "and the panels were just as strong as the floor, and the whippletree neither less nor more.