whirligig beetle


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whirligig beetle

n.
Any of various beetles of the family Gyrinidae that circle about rapidly on the surface of water and have divided eyes, with one pair above and one below the water surface.

whirligig beetle

n
(Animals) any flat-bodied water beetle of the family Gyrinidae, which circles rapidly on the surface of the water

whirl′igig bee`tle


n.
any of numerous aquatic beetles of the family Gyrinidae, commonly seen in groups circling about rapidly on the surface of water.
[1850–55]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.whirligig beetle - aquatic beetle that circles rapidly on the water surfacewhirligig beetle - aquatic beetle that circles rapidly on the water surface
beetle - insect having biting mouthparts and front wings modified to form horny covers overlying the membranous rear wings
family Gyrinidae, Gyrinidae - whirligig beetles
References in periodicals archive ?
At last Woolly Bear finds a whirligig beetle friend to snuggle up next to for the winter.
For instance, the whirligig beetle uses its sensitive antennae to detect water-surface ripples made by struggling insects.
All the robots used DC motors to generate driving force except for "Corntrack," which used a 2-cc combusting engine, and the Japanese hovercraft ("Whirligig Beetle").
Whirligig beetle - These shiny black oval-shaped beetles are often seen in great numbers on the surface of stream margins and ponds.
Spatial population structure in the whirligig beetle Dineutus assimilis: Evolutionary inferences based on mitochondrial DNA and field data.
Vulinec and Kolmes (1987) showed that the pond-dwelling whirligig beetle (D.
A whirligig beetle seeps white goo when pestered, and that slow ooze--instead of a big squirt--gives the beetle a chance in a life-or-death contest inside a fish's mouth, say Cornell University researchers.
The topics include the ghost mayfly, returning Salmonflies to the Logan River, the mystery of the spine-adorned caddisfly, encounter with Arctic black flies, a dragonfly hanging from a leaf, and in defense of whirligig beetles. Older children and young adults, as well as more general readers will find the stories fun and the science informative.
'Children of all ages get excited at seeing life under the microscope or magnifying glass, such as nymphs, phantom larvae, leeches and whirligig beetles.'