white settler


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white settler

n
(Sociology) a well-off incomer to a district who takes advantage of what it has to offer without regard to the local inhabitants
[C20: from earlier colonial sense]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
AN Indian who had been driven out of a fertile valley by a White Settler, said:
"I don't so much mind your dancing," said the White Settler, putting a fresh cartridge into his rifle, "but if you attempt to make me dance you will become a good Indian lamented by all who didn't know you.
Some day the white settlers will be in there and growing wheat down all that valley.
The pine was planted last century to replace a sacred Maori tree that was chopped down for firewood by a white settler in 1852.
nStoke-on-Trent trainer Sue Wilton sent out her first winner on the Welsh track when the well-backed White Settler hacked up under Simon Whitworth in the one-mile seller.
Henning Melber, "Namibia: The Case of a Post-Colonial White Settler Society" in Southern Africa Political and Economic Monthly, Vol.
In April 60 years ago, Peter Poole, a white settler in colonial Kenya, employed a cook known as Kamawe Musunge.
The white settler presence all over the South begins nearly always with a single story: a betrayal.
"The end of European leadership in the world will place the white settler diaspora in Australia before two choices," writes the author, Mustafa Hamid, a former senior al-Qa'ida member who in 2001 married Australian Rabiah Hutchinson, a Sydney mother with links to Islamic extremists.
Posited at the crux of the book is an attempt to challenge the exclusive and widely accepted history of the west by exploring the lives of white settler and Aboriginal women on the prairies and in British Columbia by revealing the "connection between gender, place and the processes that shaped the diversity of women's experience in the Canadian west" (p.
Set against the lush background of Kenya, it tells the story of Stanley Kinga, a black Kenyan, and Alan Knight, a white settler, who were on opposing sides during the pre-1962 independence struggle.
In the spirit of the new clarion call, two months later in August 1963, Blundell arranged a meeting between Mzee Kenyatta and the hostile white settler community in Nakuru town, where Kenyatta gave the famous 'We must forgive-and-forget-the past' speech.