white-bread


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white-bread

(wīt′brĕd′, hwīt′-)
adj.
Blandly conventional, especially when considered as typical of white middle-class America: "The proven ability of blacks to appeal to mainstream America ... shattered forever the mythology that only white-bread 'mainstream' culture could sell" (Joel Kotkin).
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

white′ bread′


n.
any white or light-colored bread made from finely ground, usu. bleached, flour.
[1300–50]

white′-bread`


adj.
usage: This term is used with disparaging intent, implying a contempt for the values of the white middle class.
adj. Informal: Disparaging.
1. pertaining to or characteristic of the white middle class; bourgeois: white-bread liberals.
2. bland; conventional.
[1975–80]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.white-bread - of or belonging to or representative of the white middle class; "white-bread America"; "a white-bread college student"
conventional - unimaginative and conformist; "conventional bourgeois lives"; "conventional attitudes"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
There's some great old footage and interviews with people like Bob Geldoff and Chrissie Hynde, and the film was made by a Mormon so it covers that angle pretty heavily, which makes it somewhat bizarre (the notable absence of swearing throughout, for example, or the attempt to square the circle of a cross-dressing, drug-gobbling rock star with his new faith-filled white-bread persona), but a good flick nonetheless.
"Using a flour blend to ensure the taste and appearance of white bread is the best way to reach a large cross-section of white-bread consumers and really drive whole grain consumption.
But so do the contestants: Do they really want to live in such a white-bread neighborhood?