white-collar


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white-col·lar

(wīt′kŏl′ər, hwīt′-)
adj.
Of or relating to workers whose work usually does not involve manual labor and who are often expected to dress with a degree of formality.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

white-collar

adj
(Industrial Relations & HR Terms) of, relating to, or designating nonmanual and usually salaried workers employed in professional and clerical occupations: white-collar union. Compare blue-collar, pink-collar
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

white′-col`lar



adj.
pertaining to or designating professional or clerical workers whose jobs are usu. salaried and do not involve manual labor.
Compare blue-collar.
[1920–25]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

white-collar

Belonging to or typical of workers who do not carry out manual labor and who are usually expected to dress formally.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.white-collar - of or designating salaried professional or clerical work or workers; "the coal miner's son aspired to a white-collar occupation as a bookkeeper"
skilled - having or showing or requiring special skill; "only the most skilled gymnasts make an Olympic team"; "a skilled surgeon has many years of training and experience"; "a skilled reconstruction of her damaged elbow"; "a skilled trade"
blue-collar - of or designating manual industrial work or workers
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

white-collar

adjective clerical, office, executive, professional, salaried, nonmanual White-collar workers are working longer and longer hours.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

white-collar

[ˈwaɪtˌkɒləʳ] ADJ white-collar workeroficinista mf
white-collar crimecrímenes mpl de guante blanco
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

white-collar

[ˈwaɪtˌkɒləʳ] adj white-collar joblavoro impiegatizio
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

white

(wait) adjective
1. of the colour of the paper on which these words are printed. The bride wore a white dress.
2. having light-coloured skin, through being of European etc descent. the first white man to explore Africa.
3. abnormally pale, because of fear, illness etc. He went white with shock.
4. with milk in it. A white coffee, please.
noun
1. the colour of the paper on which these words are printed. White and black are opposites.
2. a white-skinned person. racial trouble between blacks and whites.
3. (also ˈegg-white) the clear fluid in an egg, surrounding the yolk. This recipe tells you to separate the yolks from the whites.
4. (of an eye) the white part surrounding the pupil and iris. The whites of her eyes are bloodshot.
ˈwhiten verb
to make or become white or whiter. She used a little bleach to whiten the sheets.
ˈwhiteness noun
ˈwhitening noun
a substance used to make certain things (eg tennis shoes) white again.
ˈwhitish adjective
fairly white; close to white.
ˌwhite-ˈcollar adjective
(of workers, jobs etc) not manual; (working) in an office etc.
white elephant
a useless, unwanted possession.
white horse noun
(usually in plural) a wave that has a crest of white foam.
ˌwhite-ˈhot adjective
(of metals) so hot that they have turned white. a white-hot poker.
white lie
a not very serious lie. I'd rather tell my mother a white lie than tell her the truth and upset her.
ˈwhitewash noun
a mixture of usually lime and water, used for whitening walls.
verb
to cover with whitewash.
ˈwhitewashed adjective
white winewine
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sutherland in 1949, published his well renowned classic book named "White-Collar Crime", in which he defined this concept as, "crime committed by a person of respectability and high social status in the course of his occupation" (Sutherland: 1949).
White-collar or middle-management workers have their own tales to tell, though on the surface their world of work is 'white', and not 'blue'.
This reference for students and lawyers offers an overview of white-collar criminal law in the federal criminal context.
Murphy: appellate practice, bet-the-company litigation, commercial litigation, white-collar criminal defense, ethics and professional responsibility law, legal malpractice law-defendants
Legal experts are already debating whether there is need to bring in a new legislation to improve the conviction rate in white-collar crimes in the country.
Amid (https://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/10/business/dealbook/how-trumps-presidency-will-change-the-justice-dept-and-sec.html) signs that President Trump could go easier on white-collar crime, a former top Justice Department official said the public must carefully watch whether the new administration provides adequate resources for corporate prosecutions.
LAHORE -- Lahore Garrison University's recently established Digital Forensic Research and Service Centre (DFRSC) Monday initiated a special training course of 'Certified white-collar crime investigator' for National Accountability Bureau (NAB) officials.
In his book Working Class: Challenging Myths about Blue Collar Labor, Jeff Torlina explores how different workers answer these questions, along with many others relating to blue- and white-collar workers, and seeks to provide ideas to form the basis for new norms from which a more equal class system may emerge.
But then, after months of closed-door negotiations to craft an acceptable compromise and on the eve of a Senate Judiciary Committee vote, what Whitehouse describes as a "Trojan horse" rumbled noisily onto the stage in the form of demands by Republican Senator Orrin Hatch that the bipartisan group add provisions to weaken white-collar criminal enforcement.
RESULTS AND ANALYSIS: SENTENCING IN MAJOR WHITE-COLLAR CASES
White-collar boxing, a fast-track form of amateur boxing, has come under fire from established boxing schools.