white-nose syndrome


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white-nose syndrome

(wīt′nōz′, hwīt′-)
n.
An often fatal condition that affects hibernating bats and is characterized by white fungal growth especially on the muzzle and wing membranes.
References in periodicals archive ?
These agencies could perform these actions during the winter or summer months when gray bats would likely not be present (White-nose Syndrome Conservation and Recovery Group, 2017).
This foray is part of a continentwide effort, from Canada to Oklahoma, to plumb mines and caves in hopes of figuring out how a virulent and rapidly spreading invasive fungal bat disease called white-nose syndrome, which is bearing down on the West, will behave when it hits the native populations here.
State wildlife agencies inventory caves each year to see if their bats have the deadly white-nose syndrome that has wiped out over 90 percent of all bats in some states, and to see if the number of affected bats is increasing.
Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is providing much needed support in the fight against the bat-killing fungal disease white-nose syndrome (WNS) through an additional $1 million in grants to 39 states and the District of Columbia.
"Some of the most devastating wildlife diseases ever documented, such as white-nose syndrome in bats and chytridiomycosis in amphibians, are caused by fungal pathogens," said Jeffrey Lorch, a microbiologist with the U.S.
* Invasion Dynamics of White-Nose Syndrome Fungus, Midwestern United States, 2012-2014
Subpopulations of this species in western regions of North America are receiving increasing attention as the fungal disease white-nose syndrome (WNS) continues to reduce eastern subpopulations (Hayes 2012), and as changes in climate are likely to alter future distributions (Sherwin and others 2012).
The disease, called white-nose syndrome, has killed millions of bats across North America.
As a lifelong caver, I take offense at the assertion in "The Trouble With Bats" that scientists think white-nose syndrome was imported into the U.S.
A sick bat caught by hikers not far from Seattle on March 11 has now been confirmed as the first case west of the Rockies of the deadly bat disease white-nose syndrome.
The concern is over a fungal disease called white-nose syndrome, which has killed at least 6 million bats since the illness was first discovered in New York a decade ago.
White-nose Syndrome (WNS) decimates bat populations in North America but similar effects have not been recorded in Europe.