who's


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who's

who is: Who’s going with you?
Not to be confused with:
whose – possessive case of which or who: Whose comb is this?
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

who's

 (ho͞oz)
1. Contraction of who is.
2. Contraction of who has.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

who's

(huːz)
contraction of
who is
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

who's

short for who is, who has.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
Translations

who's

[ˈhuːz]
Who's that? → C'est qui?
Who's moved my bike? → Qui est-ce qui a déplacé ma moto?
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in classic literature ?
The first one sang-- "Who's bin digging-up MY nuts?
Who's been digging-up MY-nuts?" But nobody ever answers!
I have wrought my simple plan If I give one hour of joy To the boy who's half a man, Or the man who's half a boy.
The men who stood round much approved this speech, and one of them said, "It is desperate hard, and if a man sometimes does what is wrong it is no wonder, and if he gets a dram too much who's to blow him up?"
It is hard lines for man and it is hard lines for beast, and who's to mend it I don't know: but anyway you might tell the poor beast that you were sorry to take it out of him in that way.
"Who's this you're sending up tonight?" the station-master asked.
Who's over him, he cries; --aye, he would be a democrat to all above; look, how he lords it over all below!
"Oh, bother the credit and who's been right or wrong!
He's the type who's kept Europe back for a thousand years.
"You couldn't have come in to see protegees, humble friends, that sort of thing, or you'd have gone through into the parlour...and you couldn't have come in because you were ill, or you'd have spoken to the woman of the place, who's obviously respectable...besides, you don't look ill in that way, but only unhappy....
"Of course the superficial, on reflection," said Flambeau, "would think first of this Australian brother who's been in trouble before, who's come back so suddenly and who's just the man to have shabby confederates.
John faintly articulated the words, 'Who's to pay?'