whole language

(redirected from whole-language)

whole language

n.
A method of teaching people to read by emphasizing the recognition of words in everyday contexts and the use of books that are not textbooks.

whole′-lan′guage adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Even though there is a movement toward "balanced reading," the too-frequent reality is a thinly veiled variation of the whole-language approach with a cursory, unsystematic nod to phonics principles.
This methodology teaches both phonics skills (i.e., letter recognition, auditory discrimination among phonemes, and letter-sound relationship) and whole-language skills (i.e., the learned associations between visual recognition of words and meaning) (Bradley & Bryant, 1983; Fitzgerald, 1999; Honig, 2001; Karemaker, Pitchford & O'Malley, 2010; Matson, 1996; Reutzel & Cooter, 2004; Slavin, Lake, Davis, & Madden, 2011).
In the last half of the 20th century, there was this tension between people who focus on phonics--which just refers to methods for teaching kids how to connect spelling with spoken language--and the whole-language approach, which has its own set of faulty assumptions.
Anthony Pedriana's Leaving Johnny Behind: Overcoming Barriers to Literacy and Reclaiming At-Risk Readers answers this perennial question and explains how the educational community shifted from teaching reading based on phonics (alphabetic code) to the "whole-word" or "whole-language" approach.
Miller brought to this challenge her background as a graphic designer, training as a teacher of visually impaired students (when Jamaica was three years old), and a commitment to the whole-language reading philosophy.
The whole-language model emphasizes a focus on meaning and literature, rather than basic skill instruction such as sounding out words.
Moats exposes scientifically untenable practices in reading instruction, including: (1) use of memorization, picture cues, and contextual guessing for teaching word recognition instead of direct, systematic teaching of decoding and comprehension skills; (2) substitution of teacher modeling and reading aloud for explicit, organized instruction; (3) rejection of systematic and explicit phonics, spelling, or grammar instruction; (4) confusion of phonemic awareness with phonics; (5) reliance on leveled and trade books to organize instruction; and (6) use of whole-language approaches for English language learners.
When the whole-language movement began its meteoric rise in the 1980s, Open Court was demonized because of its emphasis on phonics.
Pressley (teacher education, counseling, educational psychology, and special education, Michigan State U.) has updated this text according to the latest research in skills-based and whole-language approaches in a highly motivated environment, focusing on fluency, vocabulary and writing.
However, the incoming school superintendent ordered that phonics instruction be replaced by "balanced literacy'--which mixes phonics with "whole-language" instruction.
To facilitate growth, I would need to provide my students with a consistently balanced and integrated approach to whole-language development (Echevarria, Vogt, & Short, 2004) which was based on their own learning and behavioral patterns.