whole-tone scale


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Related to whole-tone scale: octatonic scale

whole-tone scale

n
(Music, other) either of two scales produced by commencing on one of any two notes a chromatic semitone apart and proceeding upwards or downwards in whole tones for an octave. Such a scale, consisting of six degrees to the octave, is used by Debussy and subsequent composers

whole′-tone` scale′



n.
a musical scale progressing entirely by whole tones, as C, D, E, F♯, G♯, A♯, C.
References in periodicals archive ?
The title track, which opens the program, is especially lovely and soft; "Red Coat Lane" is a gently stomping waltz (and not one of the album's more successful tunes), while "Curbs" combines a slightly more rockish attack with a pleasantly splayed melody that almost sounds as if it were based on a whole-tone scale.
Long" on measure 16's downbeat and second beat is 5-33 (02468), a subset of the whole-tone scale, and the particular instantiation of it here (F[sharp] A[flat] B[flat] C D) is pitch-class-symmetrical around B[flat], not B.
She discusses the early songs with some admirable analysis of the harmonic language, showing how Casella took delight in modal writing, while avoiding conspicuous use of the whole-tone scale (as Ravel had advised him).
In the course of the next chorus (bars 108 to 120) he uses the first of the traditional blues motives Rouse had introduced - one of his own trademarks, the descending whole-tone scale - and makes little reference to his own composition.
Since the intervals are 240[cents], they are closely related to the 200[cents]-wide whole-tone scale of the twelve-tone system, although they have one less note.
Frisch considers it 'a masterstroke' on the grounds that 'it serves genuinely to mediate between the preceding whole-tone scale and the subsequent D-minor return' (p.
The author tells us, for example, that the March of Blackamoor employs a whole-tone scale (p.
Deriving his third-tone microintervals from the Debussian whole-tone scale, Ohana began to incorporate these intervals as a distinctive feature of his music from this time onward.