whooper


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whoop·er

 (ho͞o′pər, wo͞o′-, hwo͞o′-)
n.
1. A whooping crane.
2. A whooper swan.

whooper

(ˈwuːpə) or

whooper swan

n
(Animals) a large white Old World swan, Cygnus cygnus, having a black bill with a yellow base and a noisy whooping cry

whoop•er

(ˈhu pər, ˈʰwu-, ˈwu-)

n.
1. a person or thing that whoops.
[1650–60]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.whooper - rare North American crane having black-and-white plumage and a trumpeting callwhooper - rare North American crane having black-and-white plumage and a trumpeting call
crane - large long-necked wading bird of marshes and plains in many parts of the world
genus Grus, Grus - type genus of the Gruidae: typical cranes
2.whooper - common Old World swan noted for its whooping callwhooper - common Old World swan noted for its whooping call
swan - stately heavy-bodied aquatic bird with very long neck and usually white plumage as adult
genus Cygnus, Cygnus - a genus of Anatidae
References in periodicals archive ?
Among the birds, mountain goose, whooper swan and black-headed are in the list of those endandered.
People can dine with the local wildlife, including otters, whooper swans, wigeons and ducks, then run off a feast at the play area or explore the accessible trails.
| On Friday a Spoonbill on Anglesey's Inland Sea moved to RSPB's Cors Ddyga reserve, where a Whooper Swan and Great White Egret were seen on Saturday.
"It was seen swimming alongside whooper swans on Kebble Lough.
5 Which animal has species called Bewick, whooper and mute?
Curtis Brooner, 50, from Portland, Oregon, filed a lawsuit against Burger King asking for $9,026, an estimated money he would need to eat a Whooper meal worth $7.89 per day for next 22 years, as compensatory amount.
The arrival of thousands of wild Bewick and Whooper swans from Russia and Iceland and huge flocks of rare geese flying in make for amazing wildlife spectacles.
As the daylight hours get shorter and winter sets in, we start to see more whooper swans on the reserve.
There is indeed a statuesque beauty about wild whooper swans especially, as they glide across our lochs.
The tracks are "All the Mornings Bring", "Elves' Chasm", "Bright Angel", "Whooper Dance", "On the Steppes of Central Asia", "Witchi Tai To", "Sunset on the Great Sand Dunces", "Um Abraco (A Big Hug)", "Anabela", "Sunderland", "Eagle", "Common Ground", "Twilight", "The Last Train", "Fantasia in G", and "Morning Sun".
The migrants include mute swans, tundra swans and whooper swans.
In the cold and featureless seascape of the north Atlantic, which is neither conducive to the generation of strong thermals nor orographic updrafts, a flock of some 30 whooper swans, Cygnus cygnus, was detected in 1967 by radar then visually identified by a pilot to be flying at 8200 m with a ground-speed of 38 m [s.sup.-1] towards the end of a ~ 1000 km migration from Iceland to the UK [25].