wick


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wick

 (wĭk)
n.
1. A cord or strand of loosely woven, twisted, or braided fibers, as on a candle or oil lamp, that draws up fuel to the flame by capillary action.
2. A piece of material that conveys liquid by capillary action.
tr. & intr.v. wicked (wĭkt), wick·ing, wicks
To convey or be conveyed by capillary action: water gradually wicking up through the bricks.

[Middle English wike, from Old English wēoce.]

wick

(wɪk)
n
1. (Textiles) a cord or band of loosely twisted or woven fibres, as in a candle, cigarette lighter, etc, that supplies fuel to a flame by capillary action
2. get on someone's wick slang Brit to cause irritation to a person
[Old English weoce; related to Old High German wioh, Middle Dutch wēke (Dutch wiek)]
ˈwicking n

wick

(wɪk)
n
(Human Geography) archaic a village or hamlet
[Old English wīc; related to -wich in place names, Latin vīcus, Greek oîkos]

wick

(wɪk)
adj
1. lively or active
2. alive or crawling: a dog wick with fleas.
[dialect variant of quick alive]

Wick

(wɪk)
n
(Placename) a town in N Scotland, in Highland, at the head of Wick Bay (an inlet of the North Sea). Pop: 7333 (2001)

wick1

(wɪk)

n.
1. a twist or braid of soft threads or a woven strip, as of cotton, that in a candle, lamp, etc., serves to draw up the flammable liquid to be burned.
v.t.
2. to draw off (liquid) by capillary action.
[before 1000; Middle English wicke, weke, Old English wice, wēoc(e), c. Middle Dutch wiecke, Old High German wiohha lint, wick]
wick′less, adj.

wick3


(wik),
n.
Archaic. a village; hamlet.
[before 900; Middle English wik, wich, Old English wīc house, village (compare Old Saxon wīc, Old High German wîch) < Latin vīcus village, estate (see vicinity); c. Greek oîkos house (see ecology, economy)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wick - any piece of cord that conveys liquid by capillary actionwick - any piece of cord that conveys liquid by capillary action; "the physician put a wick in the wound to drain it"
cord - a line made of twisted fibers or threads; "the bundle was tied with a cord"
2.wick - a loosely woven cord (in a candle or oil lamp) that draws fuel by capillary action up into the flamewick - a loosely woven cord (in a candle or oil lamp) that draws fuel by capillary action up into the flame
candle, wax light, taper - stick of wax with a wick in the middle
candlewick - the wick of a candle
cord - a line made of twisted fibers or threads; "the bundle was tied with a cord"
kerosene lamp, kerosine lamp, oil lamp - a lamp that burns oil (as kerosine) for light
Translations
فَتيلَه، ذُبالَه
knot
væge
sydänsydänlanka
kanóc
kveikur
dagtis
dakts
knot
fitil
knôt

wick

[wɪk] Nmecha f
he gets on my wickme hace subir por las paredes
to dip one's wickechar un polvo

wick

[ˈwɪk] n
[candle] → mèche f
to get on sb's wick (British, British)taper à qn sur les nerfs

wick

nDocht m; to get on somebody’s wick (Brit inf) → jdm auf den Wecker gehen (inf)or fallen (inf)

wick

[wɪk] nstoppino, lucignolo

wick

(wik) noun
the twisted threads of cotton etc in a candle, lamp etc, which draw up the oil or wax into the flame.

wick

n mecha
References in classic literature ?
They made Bobby Wick pass an examination at Sandhurst.
Papa Wick had been a Commissioner in his day, holding authority over three millions of men in the Chota-Buldana Division, building great works for the good of the land, and doing his best to make two blades of grass grow where there was but one before.
We are so grateful to you for having killed the Wicked Witch of the East, and for setting our people free from bondage."
What could the little woman possibly mean by calling her a sorceress, and saying she had killed the Wicked Witch of the East?
And, as your ladyship says, if she was deceived by some wicked man, the poor wretch is to be pitied.
Anne Shirley, didn't you know it was a wicked thing to do?"
A WICKED Old Man finding himself ill sent for a Physician, who prescribed for him and went away.
The King mourned, but he did not think that the Queen had done the wicked deed, and as he was afraid the maiden would also be taken from him, he wanted to take her with him.
W.A.--That's true, indeed; but I have been a wicked wretch, and have not only forgotten to acquaint thee with anything before, but have lived without God in the world myself.
There was something in Kate's manner that was not to be resisted, and so Nathaniel Pipkin complied with the invitation; and after a great deal of blushing on his part, and immoderate laughter on that of the wicked little cousin, Nathaniel Pipkin went down on his knees on the dewy grass, and declared his resolution to remain there for ever, unless he were permitted to rise the accepted lover of Maria Lobbs.
"He certainly isn't the wild, dashing, wicked, young man Diana once wanted to marry," smiled Anne.
To give the history of a wicked life repented of, necessarily requires that the wicked part should be make as wicked as the real history of it will bear, to illustrate and give a beauty to the penitent part, which is certainly the best and brightest, if related with equal spirit and life.