wigeon

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Related to widgeons: wigeon, American Wigeon, Mareca penelope

wi·geon

also wid·geon  (wĭj′ən)
n. pl. wigeon also widgeon or wi·geons also wid·geons
Either of two freshwater dabbling ducks, Anas americana of the Americas or A. penelope primarily of Eurasia and Africa, having a grayish or brownish back and a white belly and wing coverts.

[Origin unknown.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

wigeon

(ˈwɪdʒən) or

widgeon

n
1. (Animals) a Eurasian duck, Anas penelope, of marshes, swamps, etc, the male of which has a reddish-brown head and chest and grey and white back and wings
2. (Animals) American wigeon baldpate a similar bird, Anas americana, of North America, the male of which has a white crown
[C16: of uncertain origin]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

wig•eon

(ˈwɪdʒ ən)

n., pl. -eons, (esp. collectively) -eon.
either of two dabbling ducks, Anas americana, of North America, and A. penelope, of Eurasia, having white patches on the forewings.
[1505–15]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wigeon - freshwater duck of Eurasia and northern Africa related to mallards and tealswigeon - freshwater duck of Eurasia and northern Africa related to mallards and teals
duck - small wild or domesticated web-footed broad-billed swimming bird usually having a depressed body and short legs
Anas, genus Anas - type genus of the Anatidae: freshwater ducks
American widgeon, Anas americana, baldpate - a widgeon the male of which has a white crown
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

wigeon

noun
Related words
collective nouns bunch, company, knob, flight
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
brunnakkepibeand
csörgővadkacsa

wigeon

[ˈwɪdʒən] Nánade m silbón
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

wigeon

[ˈwɪdʒən] n (Zool) → fischione m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
At last, indeed, in the conflict between his desire not to hurt Lydgate and his anxiety that no "means" should be lacking, he induced his wife privately to take Widgeon's Purifying Pills, an esteemed Middlemarch medicine, which arrested every disease at the fountain by setting to work at once upon the blood.
Should he wish to land, it is merely because he has seen a large flight of landrails or plovers, of wild ducks, teal, widgeon, or woodchucks, which fall an easy pray to net or gun.
There were geese, barrel-headed and black-backed, teal, widgeon, mallard, and sheldrake, with curlews, and here and there a flamingo.
"They came in there like widgeon to the reeds, and round and round they swung--thus!"
The luckiest can see some water birds in the lake, notably widgeons, mallards, greylag goose and great egrets.
It is a descendant of the Grumman line of flying boats and shorter than the smallest of the marque, the Widgeon, which was not at all tolerant of errors in pitch attitude on landing--many Widgeons were lost to porpoising events.
The great flocks of geese that crossed the sky in an endless, broken procession were interrupted by occasional groups of two, three or four ducks: mallards, pintails, widgeons and even a full-plumed wood duck that seemed hopelessly lost.
Hoary Congregationalists sitting around writing polished sermons, drinking claret temperately, and supping on moderate meals of "widgeons and teal" might not seem to constitute thrilling reading.