widower


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

wid·ow·er

 (wĭd′ō-ər)
n.
A man whose spouse has died and who has not remarried.

[Middle English widewer, from widewe, widow; see widow.]

widower

(ˈwɪdəʊə)
n
(Law) a man whose spouse has died and who has not remarried

wid•ow•er

(ˈwɪd oʊ ər)

n.
a man who has lost his wife by death and has not remarried.
[1325–75; late Middle English (see widow, -er1); replacing widow (now dial.), wydewa]
wid′ow•ered, adj.
wid′ow•er•hood`, n.

widow

widower
1. 'widow'

You say that a woman is a widow when her husband has died and she has not married again.

I had been a widow for five years.

When a man has died, you can refer to his wife as his widow.

His property had been left to his widow.
He visited the widow of an old school friend.
2. 'widower'

You say that a man is a widower when his wife has died and he has not married again.

He's a widower in his late forties.

When a woman has died, you can refer to her husband as her widower.

Ten years later her widower remarried.
The ceremony was attended by the widower of the Pulitzer Prize-winning author Carol Shields.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.widower - a man whose wife is dead especially one who has not remarried
adult male, man - an adult person who is male (as opposed to a woman); "there were two women and six men on the bus"
Translations
أَرْمَلأرْمَل
vdovec
enkemand
vidvo
leskimies
udovac
özvegyember
ekkill, ekkjumaîur
男やもめ
홀아비
vdovec
vdovec
änkling
พ่อหม้าย
duldul erkek
người góa vợ

widower

[ˈwɪdəʊəʳ] Nviudo m

widower

[ˈwɪdəʊər] nveuf m
He's a widower → Il est veuf.

widower

nWitwer m

widower

[ˈwɪdəʊəʳ] nvedovo

widow

(ˈwidəu) noun
a woman whose husband is dead. My brother's widow has married again.
verb
to cause to become a widow or widower. She/He was widowed in 1943.
ˈwidower noun
a man whose wife is dead.

widower

أَرْمَل vdovec enkemand Witwer χήρος viudo leskimies veuf udovac vedovo 男やもめ 홀아비 weduwnaar enkemann wdowiec viúvo вдовец änkling พ่อหม้าย dul người góa vợ 鳏夫

widower

n. viudo.

widower

n viudo
References in classic literature ?
At length a county-widower, with a daughter of fourteen, opened negotiations with the lady; and as it was a part either of the native dignity or of the artificial policy of Mrs General (but certainly one or the other) to comport herself as if she were much more sought than seeking, the widower pursued Mrs General until he prevailed upon her to form his daughter's mind and manners.
Members of the family and intimate friends were told by Daniel Jansenius that the widower had acted in a blackguard way, and that the Janseniuses did not care two-pence whether he came or stayed at home; that, but for the indecency of the thing, they were just as glad that he was keeping away.
Since then my son has become a widower and has gone travelling.
She ought not to have worn a chignon," answered Madame Nikolaeva, who had long ago made up her mind that if the elderly widower she was angling for married her, the wedding should be of the simplest.
groaned Porthos, "I am a widower and have forty thousand francs a year.
He's a widower, thirty-six years old, without any children, and is proud of his money and overbearing, and everybody is a little afraid of him.
She dreaded the performance of it, dreaded what its effect on Marianne might be; doubted whether after such an explanation she could ever be happy with another; and for a moment wished Willoughby a widower.
Her mother's first husband had been a certain Doctor Wragge -- a widower with young children; and one of those children was now the unmilitary-looking captain, whose address was "Post-office, Bristol.
He was a widower when he came, and a widower he remained, despite the fact that gossip regularly married him to this, that, or the other one, every year of his sojourn.
He told them, moreover, how his lord, if he brought him a favourable answer from the lady Dulcinea del Toboso, was to put himself in the way of endeavouring to become an emperor, or at least a monarch; for it had been so settled between them, and with his personal worth and the might of his arm it was an easy matter to come to be one: and how on becoming one his lord was to make a marriage for him (for he would be a widower by that time, as a matter of course) and was to give him as a wife one of the damsels of the empress, the heiress of some rich and grand state on the mainland, having nothing to do with islands of any sort, for he did not care for them now.
Effingham, already a widower, transmitted to Marmaduke, for safe-keeping, all his valuable effects and papers; and left the colony without his father.
Thirteen years had passed away since Lady Elliot's death, and they were still near neighbours and intimate friends, and one remained a widower, the other a widow.