widowerhood

wid·ow·er·hood

 (wĭd′ō-ər-ho͝od′)
n.
The condition or period of being a widower.

widowerhood

(ˈwɪdəʊərhʊd)
n
the condition or period of being a widower
References in classic literature ?
And add to that his widowerhood, his children, his ruined property, his debts, and the woman with whom he had fallen in love
It was noticeable in his early widowerhood how deep the affection between him and his sons.
Widowerhood has no spotlight because it was seen as a transitory phase in the life of a man, somewhere between the most recent wife and the next.
He highlighted widowerhood and physical illness amongst reasons why the older Spanish population do not have sexual intercourse.
Still, the fact that at least one-third were remarried or in committed relationships with women renders van den Hoonaard's conclusions about the experience of widowerhood somewhat problematic.
Among their topics are older parents and their adult children, brothers and sisters, grandparenting, widowhood and widowerhood, and implications of globalization and transnational communities for family life in old age.
There was something undeniably appealing about Luckan's tales of his fine breeding, that of his racehorses, their shared manorial residence in Shropshire, and his state of widowerhood.
Thus Jerome, consoling his friend Pammachius on his widowerhood, urges him to "seek him on your bed at night whom your soul loves" (Song of Songs 3:1), to confess, "I sleep, but my heart wakes" (5:2).
Their respective routes to widowerhood affected their kinship ties, specifically whether they had children, grandchildren, and in-laws.
Through recurring widowerhood and judicious remarriage he became a very wealthy man; his generosity and love of the arts, particularly music, were legendary.
Widow and widowerhood were fairly widespread during the colonial period due to high mortality rates.
The question is why Bunuel uses the power of the camera to illustrate the duality of Mateo's desire with two actresses in one role: the virgin Conchita / Bouquet, reminder of his young wife at the time of their marriage, and the sultry Conchita/Molina, expression of a desire perhaps buried by conventions of Christian culture and years of widowerhood.