wild parsnip


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wild parsnip

n
(Plants) a strong-smelling umbelliferous plant, Pastinaca sativa, that has an inedible root: the ancestor of the cultivated parsnip
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wild parsnip - biennial weed in Europe and America having large pinnate leaves and yellow flowers and a bitter and somewhat poisonous rootwild parsnip - biennial weed in Europe and America having large pinnate leaves and yellow flowers and a bitter and somewhat poisonous root; the ancestor of cultivated parsnip
Pastinaca sativa, parsnip - a strong-scented plant cultivated for its edible root
weed - any plant that crowds out cultivated plants
References in periodicals archive ?
A frequent visitor to open wet areas and gardens, the black swallowtail's host plants are primarily in the Apiaceae family, which includes carrot, wild parsnip, caraway, celery, dill, parsley, sweet fennel, and Queen Anne's lace.
"They hadn't really seen wild parsnip case this extreme and were unsure of what to do at first,"  she said.
Last year, the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) launched a guide as part of its Perfect for Pollinators initiative, listing more than 200 wildflowers, such as corncockle, teasel and wild parsnip, that provide plentiful pollen and nectar for pollinating insects.
The news is full of stories about how mosquitoes carry West Nile virus and eastern equine encephalitis, deer ticks can transmit Lyme disease, poison ivy can cause an itchy and painful rash, giant hogweed and wild parsnip might give you second-degree burns, rattlesnakes--well, enough said there--and, of course wild animals could have rabies.
Foraging: parsnip caution, 91/4:8; wild parsnip, 91/3:66; wild plants/winter food, 91/5:57
Gary McLardy came across 15 - 20 wild parsnip north of Cabin Hill, Formby.
The four finials of the headboard are carved in the shape of wild parsnip leaves.
It looks like an accident - local herbalist Juliet Spence fed him sage water hemlock, mistaking it for wild parsnip.
Experiments with the tool were conducted in a University of Illinois (UT) laboratory using leaves of wild parsnip -- Pastinaca sativa -- and cabbage loopers -- Trichoplusia ni.
Nitao and Zangerl (1987) show that flowers of wild parsnip have high constitutive concentrations of furanocoumarins, although these chemicals are not inducible in flowers (Nitao 1990) or fruits, in contrast to leaves and roots (Zangerl and Rutledge 1996).