wilder


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wil·der 1

 (wĭl′dər)
v. wil·dered, wil·der·ing, wil·ders Archaic
v.tr.
1. To lead astray; mislead.
2. To bewilder; perplex.
v.intr.
1. To lose one's way.
2. To become bewildered.

[Perhaps Middle English *wildren, blend of wilden, to be wild (from wilde, wild; see wild) and wanderen, to wander; see wander.]

wil′der·ment n.

wild·er 2

 (wīl′dər)
adj.
Comparative of wild.

wilder

(ˈwɪldə)
vb
1. to lead or be led astray
2. to bewilder or become bewildered
[C17: of uncertain origin]
ˈwilderment n

Wilder

(ˈwaɪldə)
n
1. (Biography) Billy, real name Samuel Wilder. 1906–2002, US film director and screenwriter, born in Austria. His films include Double Indemnity (1944), The Lost Weekend (1945), Sunset Boulevard (1950), The Seven Year Itch (1955), Some Like it Hot (1959), The Apartment (1960), and Buddy Buddy (1981)
2. (Biography) Thornton. 1897–1975 US novelist and dramatist. His works include the novel The Bridge of San Luis Rey (1927) and the play The Skin of Our Teeth (1942)

wil•der

(ˈwɪl dər)

v.t. Archaic.
1. to cause to lose one's way.
v.i.
2. to lose one's way.
[1605–15]

Wil•der

(ˈwaɪl dər)

n.
1. Billy (Samuel Wilder), born 1906, U.S. film director, producer, and writer; born in Austria.
2. Laura Ingalls, 1867–1957, U.S. writer of children's books.
3. Thornton (Niven), 1897–1975, U.S. novelist and playwright.

wilder


Past participle: wildered
Gerund: wildering

Imperative
wilder
wilder
Present
I wilder
you wilder
he/she/it wilders
we wilder
you wilder
they wilder
Preterite
I wildered
you wildered
he/she/it wildered
we wildered
you wildered
they wildered
Present Continuous
I am wildering
you are wildering
he/she/it is wildering
we are wildering
you are wildering
they are wildering
Present Perfect
I have wildered
you have wildered
he/she/it has wildered
we have wildered
you have wildered
they have wildered
Past Continuous
I was wildering
you were wildering
he/she/it was wildering
we were wildering
you were wildering
they were wildering
Past Perfect
I had wildered
you had wildered
he/she/it had wildered
we had wildered
you had wildered
they had wildered
Future
I will wilder
you will wilder
he/she/it will wilder
we will wilder
you will wilder
they will wilder
Future Perfect
I will have wildered
you will have wildered
he/she/it will have wildered
we will have wildered
you will have wildered
they will have wildered
Future Continuous
I will be wildering
you will be wildering
he/she/it will be wildering
we will be wildering
you will be wildering
they will be wildering
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been wildering
you have been wildering
he/she/it has been wildering
we have been wildering
you have been wildering
they have been wildering
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been wildering
you will have been wildering
he/she/it will have been wildering
we will have been wildering
you will have been wildering
they will have been wildering
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been wildering
you had been wildering
he/she/it had been wildering
we had been wildering
you had been wildering
they had been wildering
Conditional
I would wilder
you would wilder
he/she/it would wilder
we would wilder
you would wilder
they would wilder
Past Conditional
I would have wildered
you would have wildered
he/she/it would have wildered
we would have wildered
you would have wildered
they would have wildered
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wilder - United States writer and dramatist (1897-1975)Wilder - United States writer and dramatist (1897-1975)
2.Wilder - United States filmmaker (born in Austria) whose dark humor infused many of the films he made (1906-2002)
References in classic literature ?
James Wilder, his secretary, with intimation that young Lord Saltire, ten years old, his only son and heir, was about to be committed to my charge.
At those times, as the howlings and wailings and shrieking of the singers, and the ragings and roarings and explosions of the vast orchestra rose higher and higher, and wilder and wilder, and fiercer and fiercer, I could have cried if I had been alone.
I recognised its social values, I saw its ordered happiness, but a fever in my blood asked for a wilder course.
As soon as he was out of the town he had the folly to enter a forest; this was many years ago, when that region was wilder than it is now.
Bitter, bitter was the pain, and wilder and wilder grew her song, for she sang of the Love that is perfected by Death, of the Love that dies not in the tomb.
For the last time the wild cherry-tree bloomed,--wonderful blossom, glittering with tears, and gloriously radiant with stormy lights of wild passion and wilder hopes.
But here the country seemed wilder than ever, and after a long and tiresome walk through the underbrush they entered another forest, where the trees were bigger and older than any they had ever seen.
It was a singular and fantastic scene; suited to a region where everything is strange and peculiar:--These groups of trappers, and hunters, and Indians, with their wild costumes, and wilder countenances; their boisterous gayety, and reckless air; quaffing, and making merry round these sparkling fountains; while beside them lay their weep ons, ready to be snatched up for instant service.
They thought of it as a land of wild mountains and glens, a land of mists and cloud, a land where wild chieftains ruled over still wilder clans, who, in their lonely valleys and sea-girt islands, were for ever warring against each other.
The boy could not have shown a wilder, heartier interest, if she had built a fire under him.
As they moved on the country grew wilder and wilder.
As always happens, the invention grew wilder and wilder through the very tameness of the bourgeois conventions from which it had to create.