willow ptarmigan


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Related to willow ptarmigan: Willow Grouse

willow ptarmigan

n.
A ptarmigan (Lagopus lagopus) of Arctic regions, having brownish plumage that turns white in winter. Also called willow grouse.
References in periodicals archive ?
1732 1000 14 84 1677 1010 13 64 2549 1491 17 110 1685 1097 12 75 1471 851 10 71 1602 919 9 87 2493 1494 16 129 Willow Ptarmigan 590 378 7 14 Lagopus lagopus 611 372 7 16 Mean proportion 100% 60% 1% 4% of live mass Range of proportions 54%-66% 0.
The willow ptarmigan was named Alaska's state bird in 1955, but Alaska has a fantastic variety of birds, many of which reside in Alaska year-round.
2 ha); Conditions sustained for western capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus), willow ptarmigan (Lagopus lagopus), amphibian moor frog (Rana arvalis), and Leucorrhinia dragonfly populations; Spatial planning methodology developed for reducing the potential negative impacts to these species due to restoration activities, e.
This result was similar to population growth estimate of willow ptarmigan Lagopus lagopus in Canada ([lambda] = 1.
and the willow ptarmigan or willow grouse (Lagopus lagopus L.
I crossed close paths with big brown bears; saw wolves, caribou and wolverine, uncased my shotgun for Emperor geese and Canada's, willow ptarmigan and ducks.
Hunters who fill their tags early can take advantage of the excellent willow ptarmigan and grouse hunting in the land around their lodge; bird dogs are available at all of the lodges for use.
For example, the circumpolar species Lagopus lagopus (called Willow Ptarmigan, Willow Grouse, and Red Grouse) shows cycles varying in period from 3-4 to [greater than or equal to] 10 yr.
2013b) and have been hypothesized to contribute to the decline of Willow Ptarmigan (Lagopus lagopus; Henden et al.
2008: Breeding habitat selection of sympatric White-tailed, Rock and Willow Ptarmigan in the southern Yukon Territory, Canada.
The abundant willow ptarmigan and grouse make for an exciting day of wingshooting for hunters who want to take full advantage of their stay.
Deep lows in the 1940s occurred in bags of Red Grouse in Scotland, England, and Ireland, Rock Ptarmigan in Scotland, Black Grouse (Tetrao tetrix) and Capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus) in Scotland (Mackenzie 1952), and Willow Ptarmigan (Lagopus lagopus) in Finland (Siivonen 1948).