willow tit

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willow tit

n
(Animals) a small tit, Parus montanus, of marshy woods in Europe, having a greyish-brown body and dull black crown
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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In places where there are marsh tits, willow tits and crested tits - the latter exclusively resident in the Speyside pine forests - plus the usual blue and great tit varieties, the coal tit is very much the subservient bird.
I was searching for Willow Tits, subject of the first dedicated UK survey organised by the RSPB, NRW and the Welsh Ornithological Society, among others.
Willow tits live in scrubby woodland and many developers will say that this is not important habitat.
Many British birds are doing less well, with turtle doves down 94%, willow tits by 80% and marsh tits by 41%.
I have had blue, great, coal, longtail and willow tits in the garden over the years.
Numbers of willow tits have fallen by 91% and the lesser spotted woodpecker, the smallest of the UK's woodpeckers, have dropped by more than three-quarters (76%), according to the RSPB.
"It's especially worrying that woodland birds that don't migrate, such as marsh tits and willow tits, aren't doing very well because they seem to have disappeared for no apparent reason.
The British Trust for Ornithology says that scientific studies show parakeets lead to a fall in the population of nuthatches and there are concerns for willow tits and woodpeckers that compete with the tropical birds for nesting space.
In a wildlife section visitors are invited to view, live or recorded, Greater Horseshoe bats as well as nesting barn owls, goldfinches, willow tits, woodpeckers, nuthatches, sparrow hawks and swallows.
Just to the north of Warrington he has seen and heard a pair of willow tits, close to the M62, and watched yellow wagtails feeding young.
The numbers of woodland birds also fell by six per cent, in line with national statistics with willow warblers and willow tits being worst hit.
Researchers studying seed-caching willow tits found that blood concentrations of corticosterone double during the worst winter months.