winch


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winch

a hoisting machine: They used a winch to hoist the wrecked cars onto the crusher.
Not to be confused with:
wench – peasant girl; female servant; wanton woman: a saucy little wench
wrench – a tool with jaws for gripping, turning, or twisting an object: Sometimes I have to use a wrench to open jars.

winch

 (wĭnch)
n.
1. A stationary motorized or hand-powered machine used for hoisting or hauling, having a drum around which is wound a rope, cable, or chain attached to the load being moved.
2. The crank used to give motion to a grindstone or similar device.
tr.v. winched, winch·ing, winch·es
To move with or as if with a winch.

[Middle English winche, pulley, from Old English wince, reel, roller.]

winch′er n.

winch

(wɪntʃ)
n
1. (Mechanical Engineering) a windlass driven by a hand- or power-operated crank
2. (Mechanical Engineering) a hand- or power-operated crank by which a machine is driven
vb
(Mechanical Engineering) (tr; often foll by up or in) to pull (in a rope) or lift (a weight) using a winch
[Old English wince pulley; related to wink1]
ˈwincher n

winch

(wɪntʃ)
vb
(intr) an obsolete word for wince1

winch

(wɪntʃ)

n.
1. the crank or handle of a revolving machine.
2. a windlass turned by a crank, for hoisting or hauling.
3. any of various devices for cranking.
v.t.
4. to hoist or haul (a load) by means of a winch.
[before 1050; Middle English winche, Old English wince pulley; akin to wench, wince, wink1]
winch′er, n.

winch

A hoisting machine used for loading and discharging cargo and stores or for hauling in lines. See also stores.

winch


Past participle: winched
Gerund: winching

Imperative
winch
winch
Present
I winch
you winch
he/she/it winches
we winch
you winch
they winch
Preterite
I winched
you winched
he/she/it winched
we winched
you winched
they winched
Present Continuous
I am winching
you are winching
he/she/it is winching
we are winching
you are winching
they are winching
Present Perfect
I have winched
you have winched
he/she/it has winched
we have winched
you have winched
they have winched
Past Continuous
I was winching
you were winching
he/she/it was winching
we were winching
you were winching
they were winching
Past Perfect
I had winched
you had winched
he/she/it had winched
we had winched
you had winched
they had winched
Future
I will winch
you will winch
he/she/it will winch
we will winch
you will winch
they will winch
Future Perfect
I will have winched
you will have winched
he/she/it will have winched
we will have winched
you will have winched
they will have winched
Future Continuous
I will be winching
you will be winching
he/she/it will be winching
we will be winching
you will be winching
they will be winching
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been winching
you have been winching
he/she/it has been winching
we have been winching
you have been winching
they have been winching
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been winching
you will have been winching
he/she/it will have been winching
we will have been winching
you will have been winching
they will have been winching
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been winching
you had been winching
he/she/it had been winching
we had been winching
you had been winching
they had been winching
Conditional
I would winch
you would winch
he/she/it would winch
we would winch
you would winch
they would winch
Past Conditional
I would have winched
you would have winched
he/she/it would have winched
we would have winched
you would have winched
they would have winched
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.winch - lifting device consisting of a horizontal cylinder turned by a crank on which a cable or rope winds
capstan - a windlass rotated in a horizontal plane around a vertical axis; used on ships for weighing anchor or raising heavy sails
lifting device - a device for lifting heavy loads
ship - a vessel that carries passengers or freight
yard donkey, yarder - a winch (or system of winches) powered by an engine and used to haul logs from a stump to a landing or to a skid road
Verb1.winch - pull or lift up with or as if with a winch; "winch up the slack line"
draw, pull, force - cause to move by pulling; "draw a wagon"; "pull a sled"
Translations
وِنْش: مِرْفاع، ذِراع تَدْويريَرْفَع بالوِنْش
hejse ved hjælp af et spilspil
treuilwinch
csõrlõvel felemel
lyfta/draga meî vinduvinda
kelti gervepakelti gerve
vinča
rumpál
vinçvinçle kaldırmak/çekmek

winch

[wɪntʃ]
A. Ntorno m, cabrestante m
B. VT (also winch up) → levantar (con un torno or cabrestante)
he was winched up by the helicopterlo levantaron con el helicóptero
to winch sth downbajar algo (con un torno or cabrestante)

winch

[ˈwɪntʃ] ntreuil m

winch

nWinde f, → Winsch f
vtwinschen

winch

[wɪntʃ]
1. nargano, verricello
2. vt to winch up/downsollevare/abbassare con un argano

winch

(wintʃ) noun
a type of powerful machine for hoisting or hauling heavy loads.
verb
to hoist (up) or haul (in) using a winch.
References in classic literature ?
"I had a dim notion of escaping, and I crawled on hands and knees to the winch, where I managed to drag myself to my feet.
Without saying a word she took hold of the winch (it was turned by handpower then), and round she swung him, and Jack began to flop about inside.
Against their lurid background dark figures were bending and straining, twisting and turning, with the motion of winch or of windlass, to the rhythm of an eternal clank and roar.
Billy could hear them throwing down the halyards, casting off gaskets, and heaving the anchor short on the tiny winch. In several minutes one called down that everything was ready, and all went on deck.
Her cargo is not stowed in any sense; it is simply dumped into her through six hatchways, more or less, by twelve winches or so, with clatter and hurry and racket and heat, in a cloud of steam and a mess of coal-dust.
But early as he woke on the next morning--and although there was an excuse for not prolonging sleep in the constant whirr and rattle of the "donkey" engine winches of the great ship--he met the eyes of Adam fixed on him from his berth.
And if she fails, she'll try to get her money back by saving the gear--spars, you know, and patent steering-gear, and winches, and such things.
"No," cried Jukes, raising a weary, discouraged voice above the harsh buzz of the Nan-Shan's friction winches. All of them were hard at work, snatching slings of cargo, high up, to the end of long derricks, only, as it seemed, to let them rip down recklessly by the run.
It was high water, blowing fresh with a drizzle; the double dock- gates were opened, and the steam colliers were going in and out in the darkness with their lights burning bright, a great plashing of propellers, rattling of winches, and a lot of hailing on the pier-heads.
TURRET WINCH UPGRADE Following an inspection and survey of the components, Petrofac awarded a contract to ACE Winches to rebuild a turret winch aboard an FSU vessel.
boost over the previous model, and can be configured with a spur or worm gear hand winch for short, less frequent lifts, or power winch for longer, more frequent lifts.