wincing


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Related to wincing: misattributed

wince

 (wĭns)
intr.v. winced, winc·ing, winc·es
To shrink or start involuntarily, as in pain or distress; flinch.
n.
A shrinking or startled movement or gesture.

[Middle English wincen, to kick, from Old North French *wencier, variant of Old French guencir, of Germanic origin.]

winc′er n.
References in classic literature ?
Then he and the sergeant set her arm and put it in splints, she wincing but not whimpering; then we took up the march for home, and that's the end of the tale; and I'm her horse.
'Thrushcross Grange is my own, sir,' he interrupted, wincing. 'I should not allow any one to inconvenience me, if I could hinder it - walk in!'
'So, by little and little, and not living high, I managed to scrape up the hundred pounds at last,' said Traddles; 'and thank Heaven that's paid - though it was - though it certainly was,' said Traddles, wincing again as if he had had another tooth out, 'a pull.
He was wincing and the ambulance crews with him gave him a pump to take breaths from."
Some days I actually saw him wince with pain and I asked my mum 'why's he wincing?' and she said 'your father's got shrapnel in his body still," he said.