wind shear


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wind shear

 (wĭnd)
n.
A significant variation in the speed or velocity of the wind with respect to location or altitude, as in the speed change of a downdraft, or in the directional change of lateral winds along the edge of a thunderstorm.

wind shear

(wɪnd)
n
(Aeronautics) stress on an aircraft in an area in which winds of different speeds and directions are close together

wind′ shear`

(wɪnd)
n.
1. the rate at which wind velocity changes from point to point in a given direction.
2. a condition, dangerous to aircraft, in which the speed or direction of the wind changes abruptly.

wind shear

A change of wind direction and magnitude.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The result is a broad zone of formidable mixing along the frontal boundary, with strong turbulence and the potential for strong wind shear.
Lighter wind shears also are associated with La NiAaAaAeA~a in the Atlantic, which doesn't suppress storms and c create ideal conditions for hurricanes.
To understand the increased frequency in tornado outbreaks, the researchers looked at two factors: convective available potential energy, or CAPE, and storm relative helicity, which is a measure of vertical wind shear.
The computational model allows for three-dimensional analysis of wind shear and unsteady turbulence over the island.
It had many firings in the 1960s, during which nighttime chemical releases yielded valuable data on wind shear at altitudes up to 130 kilometers (81 miles).
A warm or "El Nino" phase typically brings elevated wind shear to the Atlantic deep tropics, suppressing tropical cyclone development and generally leading to fewer hurricanes for the Atlantic Basin.
This is achieved using a wind shear exponent or wind shear coefficient (WSC), variation in wind speed as a function of height, with two mathematical models of power law (PL) and Logarithmic Law (LL) used for extrapolation [14].
The aviation community did not pay much attention to the threat of variable wind fields until one Boeing-727 flight of Eastern Airlines crashed as a result of serious wind shear in 1975 [1].
The importance of characterizing the wind shear at a specified location for the utilization of wind turbine is of vital importance.
Using computer simulations of cloud systems, Rafkin found that with a bit of wind shear, Titan could produce giant, long-lasting storm systems.
The company said these two Terminal Doppler Lidar systems are capable of detecting nearby low-level wind shear and turbulence during non-precipitation conditions.