wind shear


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wind shear

 (wĭnd)
n.
A significant variation in the speed or velocity of the wind with respect to location or altitude, as in the speed change of a downdraft, or in the directional change of lateral winds along the edge of a thunderstorm.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

wind shear

(wɪnd)
n
(Aeronautics) stress on an aircraft in an area in which winds of different speeds and directions are close together
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

wind′ shear`

(wɪnd)
n.
1. the rate at which wind velocity changes from point to point in a given direction.
2. a condition, dangerous to aircraft, in which the speed or direction of the wind changes abruptly.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

wind shear

A change of wind direction and magnitude.
Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms. US Department of Defense 2005.
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References in periodicals archive ?
But if the "wind shear" warning blares out, the automatic response is to cancel the landing and go around again, he said.
It listed ''contributory factors'' as including inability of the flight crew to apply wind shear recovery procedures and the use of inappropriate equipment for wind shear recovery procedure during simulator recurrrency.
Scientists understand very little about how these wind shears affect space weather.
The impact of the normal SST across the equatorial Pacific basin is that the vertical wind shear across the tropical Atlantic will be stronger than it was last year during the La Nina event.
"Wind shear usually only lasts for a few minutes but when he tried to land the second time it was still there so he decided to divert to Doha for the safety of the passengers.
NARITA, Japan - A FedEx cargo plane which burst into flames after a crash landing Monday at Narita airport near Tokyo must have lost its steering control due to wind shear that hit the plane the moment before landing, transport ministry investigative sources said Tuesday.
Investigators believe wind shear, or a sudden gust of wind, may have been a factor.
Wind shear is particularly dangerous for planes during take-off or landing when pilots have barely seconds to respond to sudden the sudden change in conditions.
The study showed that warmer waters in the tropical Pacific, Indian, and North Atlantic oceans produce opposite effects upon vertical wind shear. Overall, warming in the Pacific and Indian oceans is of greater impact and produces increased levels of vertical wind shear, which suppresses Atlantic hurricane activity.
"Three out of six low-level wind shear alert systems were not working at the time," said Vuttichai Singhamanee, director of flight standard bureau of Transport Ministry's Aviation Authority Department.
One factor is wind shear, which describes adjacent layers of air that move at different speeds or in different directions.
In both equations, a coefficient is used, which characterizes the average wind shear curve.