wind sprint

wind sprint

 (wĭnd)
n.
One of a series of sprints run to develop breath and endurance.

wind′ sprint`

(wɪnd)
n.
a sprint, usu. one of several, run by an athlete for training purposes.
[1945–50]
References in periodicals archive ?
Jerry leads the BEF scholarship and transplant grant programs, as well as hosts a podcast series and the CF Wind Sprint video series.
On December 11, as the stock market entered the final turn in its wind sprint toward 2,000, John Phelan, chairman of the New York Stock Exchange, suggested that stock index futures, in combination with certain recent trading strategies, might cause the market to experience a "meltdown.
PLATFORM CI also features a customizable WIND SPRINT
He was halfway through the wind sprint when a teammate called out:
Everything Must Go" took roughly a year to record -- a veritable wind sprint given Becker and Fagen's legendary meticulousness in the studio.
It wasn't the end of the world if I didn't run my wind sprint at 7:17, and I never really treated it like that.
Every wind sprint he ran in preparation for this year, every batting practice swing or infield grounder he took, the loss to Carson was on his mind.
Every wind sprint of every practice last season was geared toward winning the school's first football title in 32 years, and Ward figured to be front and center when it happened, perhaps making a game-saving tackle or interception from his defensive back position.
In my quest to become a star receiver for the Buccaneers, I was down for the weight room and wind sprints, but ice baths?
Before you knew it, spring training was well on its way to being a profit center in which teams would share facilities; figure out ways to get fans excited about bunting drills, wind sprints, and batting practice; and squeeze lots of cash out of what used to be a way for players to work out the kinks from their offseason jobs in the factory, in the shoe store, or on the farm.
With Wind Sprints, Axios continues its series of Epstein essay collections, following Essays in Biography and A Literary Education.
We prefer Santa Claus (Clinton, Obama), not the high school coach who makes us do wind sprints (Mitt Romney).