windbag

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wind·bag

 (wĭnd′băg′)
n.
1. The flexible air-filled chamber of a bagpipe or similar instrument.
2. Slang A talkative person who communicates nothing of substance or interest.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

windbag

(ˈwɪndˌbæɡ)
n
1. slang a voluble person who has little of interest to communicate
2. (Instruments) the bag in a set of bagpipes, which provides a continuous flow of air to the pipes
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

wind•bag

(ˈwɪndˌbæg)

n.
an empty, voluble, pretentious talker.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.windbag - a boring person who talks a great deal about uninteresting topics
bore, dullard - a person who evokes boredom
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

windbag

noun bore, boaster, gossip, prattler, loudmouth (informal), braggart, blether (Scot.), bigmouth (slang), gasbag (informal), blowhard (informal), bullshitter (taboo slang), bullshit artist (taboo slang) He's just a boring old windbag.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

windbag

[ˈwɪndbæg] N (= person) → hablador(a) m/f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

windbag

[ˈwɪndbæg] nbaudruche fwind-blown windblown [ˈwɪndbləʊn] adj
[sand, pollen] → transporté(e) par le vent
[hair] → coiffé(e) en coup de vent
His blond hair was windblown → Ses cheveux blonds étaient coiffés en coup de vent.wind-borne [ˈwaɪndbɔːrn] adj [seeds, pollen] → transporté(e) par le vent
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

windbag

[ˈwɪndˌbæg] n (fam) (person) → trombone m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
England, the man can do his sums, but I do wonder what purpose the Welsh Assembly serves apart from providing a platform for windbags dreaming up ways to spend our money and as Brian Christley, letters to the Daily Post pointed out recently, creating an arbitrary line between England and Wales resulting in a host of problems for people living near it.
You do realise that we're talking WAG here, those pompous windbags who have made vascillation and inertia into a lucrative industry.
Are we to understand that from Mr O'Sullivan's surname that he is Irish, and so paints all Welsh people as windbags, or since he comes from Pyle, that he considers himself Welsh, and therefore is more than a little confused?
BERNIE Ecclestone, Formula One's chief executive, has hit back at the sport's drivers by describing them as "windbags".
Asked if the drivers were "windbags" - a term used to describe a person who speaks at length but says little of any value - Ecclestone replied: "Some of them."
Because the hot air generated by those two windbags would give that 100 megawatt turbine farm a real run for its money.
Ministers are frightful windbags and should only put in an appearance when invited or have something useful to say other than lavish helpings of jam tomorrow.
It's apparent that voting for party political windbags has been disastrous.
The kids experienced truly cool educational projects--such as making glowing worms, geyser rocket cars, square bubble-makers, windbags, as well as LEGO robots and flying film canisters.
The revolution will be here next, unless something is done about this sheer number of unnecessary windbags. Dai Woosnam, Grimsby
Whilst I agree that the MPs aren't exactly the most hard-working people in the country and the phrase "chuntering, self-important windbags" isn't entirely undeserved, I would like to point out that 12 weeks' holiday a year with a salary of pounds 66,000 while not really doing all that much work is just as good a description of a huge number of teachers.
It has become a talking shop for a lot of failed politicians, greedy washed-up TDs who fail to get re-elected and verbose windbags.