windbreak

(redirected from windbreaks)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

wind·break

 (wĭnd′brāk′)
n.
A row of trees, a hedge, or a fence that serves to lessen the force of or provide shelter from the wind.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

windbreak

(ˈwɪndˌbreɪk)
n
(Physical Geography) a fence, line of trees, etc, serving as a protection from the wind by breaking its force
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

wind•break

(ˈwɪndˌbreɪk)

n.
a growth of trees, a structure of boards, or the like serving as a shelter from the wind.
[1765–75]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

windbreak

- A row of trees acting as a fence.
See also related terms for row.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

windbreak

A fence, hedge or mixed border of trees and shrubs that filter the wind and provide shelter.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.windbreak - hedge or fence of trees designed to lessen the force of the wind and reduce erosion
hedge, hedgerow - a fence formed by a row of closely planted shrubs or bushes
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

windbreak

[ˈwɪndbreɪk] N (natural) → abrigada f, barrera f contra el viento; (for plants) → pantalla f cortavientos; (at seaside) → cortavientos m inv
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

windbreak

[ˈwɪndbreɪk] nbrise-vent m inv
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

windbreak

[ˈwɪndˌbreɪk] nfrangivento
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
The now ubiquitous Casuarinas were brought to the Bahamas and nearby south Florida to serve as windbreaks. Much of the rest of the islands' vegetation is scrub-like, baked by sun and rustled by trade winds.
Windbreaks and shelter-belts are associated mainly with U.S.
Sahel, Sudanese villagers learn how to plant windbreaks and reforest the banks of a river.
960 thousand seedlings have been already provided, including 185 thousand forest seedlings, 522 thousand for pasture, 142 thousand windbreaks, 12 thousand semi-foresters and 117 thousand decorative ones.
Fourth, but not last, trees act as windbreaks, cutting wind speed up to 15 percent.
When pioneers moved to the Nebraska Territory, which was at that time a treeless plain, they needed trees for building materials, fuel, windbreaks and shade from the hot prairie sun.
However, if you live in an extreme climate you might need to help them stay warm by providing insulation or windbreaks.
While most people are familiar with windbreaks of large evergreens and conifers, mixed plantings can also be effective at blocking the wind.