windlass

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windlass

wind·lass

 (wĭnd′ləs)
n.
Any of numerous hauling or lifting machines consisting essentially of a horizontal cylinder turned by a crank or a motor so that a line attached to the load is wound around the cylinder.
tr.v. wind·lassed, wind·lass·ing, wind·lass·es
To raise with a windlass.

[Middle English wyndlas, alteration of windas, from Old Norse vindāss : vinda, to wind + āss, pole.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

windlass

(ˈwɪndləs)
n
(Mechanical Engineering) a machine for raising weights by winding a rope or chain upon a barrel or drum driven by a crank, motor, etc
vb
(Mechanical Engineering) (tr) to raise or haul (a weight, etc) by means of a windlass
[C14: from Old Norse vindáss, from vinda to wind2 + ass pole; related to Old French guindas, Middle Low German, Dutch windas]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

wind•lass

(ˈwɪnd ləs)

n.
1. a device for hauling or hoisting, commonly having a horizontal drum on which a rope attached to the load is wound; winch.
v.t.
2. to raise, haul, or move (a load) by means of a windlass.
[1350–1400; Middle English wind(e)las < Old Norse vindāss=vinda to wind2 + āss beam]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

windlass


Past participle: windlassed
Gerund: windlassing

Imperative
windlass
windlass
Present
I windlass
you windlass
he/she/it windlasses
we windlass
you windlass
they windlass
Preterite
I windlassed
you windlassed
he/she/it windlassed
we windlassed
you windlassed
they windlassed
Present Continuous
I am windlassing
you are windlassing
he/she/it is windlassing
we are windlassing
you are windlassing
they are windlassing
Present Perfect
I have windlassed
you have windlassed
he/she/it has windlassed
we have windlassed
you have windlassed
they have windlassed
Past Continuous
I was windlassing
you were windlassing
he/she/it was windlassing
we were windlassing
you were windlassing
they were windlassing
Past Perfect
I had windlassed
you had windlassed
he/she/it had windlassed
we had windlassed
you had windlassed
they had windlassed
Future
I will windlass
you will windlass
he/she/it will windlass
we will windlass
you will windlass
they will windlass
Future Perfect
I will have windlassed
you will have windlassed
he/she/it will have windlassed
we will have windlassed
you will have windlassed
they will have windlassed
Future Continuous
I will be windlassing
you will be windlassing
he/she/it will be windlassing
we will be windlassing
you will be windlassing
they will be windlassing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been windlassing
you have been windlassing
he/she/it has been windlassing
we have been windlassing
you have been windlassing
they have been windlassing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been windlassing
you will have been windlassing
he/she/it will have been windlassing
we will have been windlassing
you will have been windlassing
they will have been windlassing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been windlassing
you had been windlassing
he/she/it had been windlassing
we had been windlassing
you had been windlassing
they had been windlassing
Conditional
I would windlass
you would windlass
he/she/it would windlass
we would windlass
you would windlass
they would windlass
Past Conditional
I would have windlassed
you would have windlassed
he/she/it would have windlassed
we would have windlassed
you would have windlassed
they would have windlassed
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.windlass - lifting device consisting of a horizontal cylinder turned by a crank on which a cable or rope winds
capstan - a windlass rotated in a horizontal plane around a vertical axis; used on ships for weighing anchor or raising heavy sails
lifting device - a device for lifting heavy loads
ship - a vessel that carries passengers or freight
yard donkey, yarder - a winch (or system of winches) powered by an engine and used to haul logs from a stump to a landing or to a skid road
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

windlass

[ˈwɪndləs] Ntorno m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

windlass

[ˈwɪndləs] n (= winch) → treuil m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

windlass

n (= winch)Winde f; (Naut) → Ankerwinde f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

windlass

[ˈwɪndləs] nargano, verricello
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
By this time a whole village was up: and windlasses, ropes, poles, candles, lanterns, all things necessary, were fast collecting and being brought into one place, to be carried to the Old Hell Shaft.
(11) In a third laboratory study of improvised windlasses, effectiveness, windlass turn numbers, time to stop bleeding, the number of windlasses, and the under-tourniquet pressure were associated inversely with breakage.
Compared with the conventional mooring system, the new scheme adds active mooring line release control to improve the positioning accuracy and uses four threes-procket windlasses instead of twelve single-sprocket windlasses to control twelve mooring lines release based on mooring line switching.
Deck machinery consists of anchor windlasses, which are used for anchoring and anchor hoisting, and mooring winches, which are used to moor a vessel to a pier or berthing facilities.