windpipe


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wind·pipe

 (wĭnd′pīp′)
n.

windpipe

(ˈwɪndˌpaɪp)
n
(Anatomy) a nontechnical name for trachea1

wind•pipe

(ˈwɪndˌpaɪp)

n.
the trachea of an air-breathing vertebrate.

wind·pipe

(wĭnd′pīp′)
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.windpipe - membranous tube with cartilaginous rings that conveys inhaled air from the larynx to the bronchiwindpipe - membranous tube with cartilaginous rings that conveys inhaled air from the larynx to the bronchi
epiglottis - a flap of cartilage that covers the windpipe while swallowing
upper respiratory tract - the nose and throat and trachea
cartilaginous tube - a duct with cartilaginous walls
cervix, neck - the part of an organism (human or animal) that connects the head to the rest of the body; "he admired her long graceful neck"; "the horse won by a neck"

windpipe

noun throat
Related words
technical name trachea
adjective tracheal, tracheate
Translations
قَصَبَةٌ هَوائِيَّه
průdušnice
luftrør
LuftröhreTrachea
henkitorvikanavaputkitorvi
dušnik
légcsõ
barki, öndunarvegur
priedušnica
sapnik
luftstrupe
nefes borusu

windpipe

[ˈwɪndpaɪp] Ntráquea f

windpipe

[ˈwɪndpaɪp] ntrachée fwind power [ˈwɪndpaʊər] nénergie f éolienne

windpipe

[ˈwɪndˌpaɪp] n (Anat) → trachea

wind1

(wind) noun
1. (an) outdoor current of air. The wind is strong today; There wasn't much wind yesterday; Cold winds blow across the desert.
2. breath. Climbing these stairs takes all the wind out of me.
3. air or gas in the stomach or intestines. His stomach pains were due to wind.
verb
to cause to be out of breath. The heavy blow winded him.
adjective
(of a musical instrument) operated or played using air pressure, especially a person's breath.
ˈwindy adjective
a windy hill-top; a windy day; It's windy today.
ˈwindiness noun
ˈwindfall noun
1. an apple etc blown from a tree.
2. any unexpected gain or success.
ˈwindmill noun
a machine with sails that work by wind power, for grinding corn or pumping water.
ˈwindpipe noun
the passage for air between mouth and lungs.
windsurf, windsurfer, windsurfingwindˈwindscreen noun
(American ˈwindshield).
1. a transparent (usually glass) screen above the dashboard of a car.
2. a wall usually constructed out from the house wall to protect people on a patio or balcony from the wind.
ˈwindsock noun
a device for indicating the direction and speed of wind on an airfield.
windsurf (ˈwindsəːf) verb
to move across water while standing on a windsurfer.
ˈwindsurfer noun
1. (also sailboard) a board with a sail for moving across water with the aid of the wind.
2. the person controlling this board.
ˈwindsurfing noun
ˈwindswept adjective
exposed to the wind and showing the effects of it. windswept hair; a windswept landscape.
get the wind up
to become nervous or anxious. She got the wind up when she realized how close we were to the edge.
get wind of
to get a hint of or hear indirectly about.
get one's second wind
to recover one's natural breathing after breathlessness.
in the wind
about to happen. A change of policy is in the wind.
like the wind
very quickly. The horse galloped away like the wind.

wind·pipe

n. tráquea; pop. gaznate.

windpipe

n (fam) tráquea
References in classic literature ?
But he cannot in any degree breathe through his mouth, for, in his ordinary attitude, the Sperm Whale's mouth is buried at least eight feet beneath the surface; and what is still more, his windpipe has no connexion with his mouth.
Besides the soreness in my mouth, and the pain in my neck, it always made my windpipe feel bad, and if I had stopped there long I know it would have spoiled my breathing; but I grew more and more restless and irritable, I could not help it; and I began to snap and kick when any one came to harness me; for this the groom beat me, and one day, as they had just buckled us into the carriage, and were straining my head up with that rein, I began to plunge and kick with all my might.
My hands were at its throat before the fangs had a chance to bury themselves in my neck, and slowly I forced the hairy face from me and closed my fingers, vise-like, upon its windpipe.
First it was her arms that wound themselves about my neck, long, sinuous, and supple as the tentacles of some vile monster; then, as I struggled, her thumbs were on my windpipe like pads of steel.
The exclamation of surprise that almost burst from his lips was throttled in his throat by steel-thewed fingers that closed about his windpipe with the suddenness of thought.
The pirate's hissing, "Die, cursed thern," was half choked in his windpipe by my clutching fingers.
So quickly did Tarzan of the Apes drag back his prey that Kulonga's cry of alarm was throttled in his windpipe.
The latter reached upward for the swinging rounds, and as he did so steel fingers closed upon his windpipe and a steel blade pierced the very centre of his heart.
He struggled a little at first, but finally lay still, and so I released the pressure of my fingers at his windpipe, for which I imagine he was quite thankful--I know that I should have been.
A great hand was upon his windpipe, and he was being borne to the earth.
Again he emerged, strangling with more salt water in his windpipe.
Two thumbs pressed into his neck on either side of the windpipe directly on the carotid arteries, shutting off the blood to his brain and giving him most exquisite agony, at the same time rendering him unconscious far more swiftly than the swiftest anaesthetic.