wingbeat

(redirected from wingbeats)

wingbeat

(ˈwɪŋˌbiːt)
n
(Zoology) a complete cycle of moving the wing by a bird when flying
References in periodicals archive ?
An optical sensor below the insect collected data about mosquito wingbeats, an air inlet and vacuum line streamed odors into the arena, and the LED display showed different types of visual stimuli.
An optical sensor below the mosquito gathered information on wingbeats, its frequency and direction.
He even can count the number of wingbeats of individual birds to ascertain how much energy is expended by each.
Artificial intelligence researchers have developed a mosquito early warning system that raises the alarm when the insects are near by detecting the whine of their wingbeats.
This means that the receiver is not susceptible to noise stemming from an external origin and light reflected from the wingbeats of insects flying over the sensor.
While northern Downeasters were market gunning Merrymeeting Bay, their southern counterparts and distant relatives were doing likewise in areas like Core Sound--a few wingbeats away from, and really just an offshoot of--the larger Pamlico Sound, the second largest estuary system in the U.S.
Frenetic wingbeats clans uplift, imperious now glide the swifts.
'This is an owl with a wingspan and body length nearly as large as those of a small eagle weighing eight pounds although the owl itself weights less than half that.' Most of their size, it seems, comes from feathers, which serve to silence their wingbeats and keep them warm in climates too cold for lesser birds.
Male mosquitoes' wide, feathery antennae pick up harmonic overtones of the whine of female wingbeats. The mosquitoes then synchronize one of the wingbeat overtones.
Small birds such as choughs readily take to the air but swans are much larger and typically require 15-20 wingbeats to become aloft when taking off from water, even though they can obtain some acceleration and weight support from webbed feet.
Well, it was a red-letter half hour or so, our eager little band of merry men wading into a classic covey that flushed into a brisk wind at 25 mph and accelerated in two wingbeats to the speed of my wishful thinking.