winged bean

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winged bean

n.
A twining tropical plant (Psophocarpus tetragonolobus) in the pea family, having pods with four winglike ridges and cultivated for its edible roots, leaves, pods, and seeds.

winged′ bean′


n.
a tropical Asian vine, Psophocarpus tetragonolobus, of the legume family, having an edible pod with four projecting parts.
[1905–10]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.winged bean - a tuberous twining annual vine bearing clusters of purplish flowers and pods with four jagged wingswinged bean - a tuberous twining annual vine bearing clusters of purplish flowers and pods with four jagged wings; Old World tropics
goa bean - Old World tropical bean
genus Psophocarpus, Psophocarpus - species of tropical Asian and African climbing herbs
vine - a plant with a weak stem that derives support from climbing, twining, or creeping along a surface
References in periodicals archive ?
There were cottages and daybeds that appealed to our weary bodies, but those had to wait as chef Meann Guardian first taught us how to prepare two local specialties-kinunot (flaked fish in coconut milk) and sigarilyas with baluko (winged beans and scallops).
I've also found that 'Green Noodle' and 'Rattlesnake' pole beans are my most reliable, though perennial winged beans do nicely too.
RVG has also started planting corn, radish, pechay, kalabasa, string and winged beans, tomatoes, green chili, ampalaya.
Jade loves Filipino food like tinapa (smoked fish), ginataan (dishes with coconut milk), and liempo (grilled pork belly), as well as vegetables like sigarilyas (winged beans), sitaw (green beans), and monggo (mung bean).
Harju-Westman said, "If you don't fancy having white beans or want to introduce some variety, you can try winged beans or navy beans, both of which also provide plenty of calcium."
In the City Line neighbourhood of Brooklyn, Bangladeshi immigrants tend a community garden with spinach, winged beans, long beans and bitter melon gourds.
Many young kids, including the iGeneration, in urban and rural settings, have no idea how vegetables grow or know the taste of a passion fruit or Chinese winged beans directly from the garden.
Vegetarians and those who simply dislike meat can enjoy many high-protein vegetables such as sun-dried tomatoes, soybean sprouts, winged beans, and garlic.
Sathe and Salunkhe (1981) reported 21 and 27% losses of protein in winged beans flour soaked in NaOH and KOH solutions due to washing.
Mich Hein, a scientist at Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, California, was looking for a source of winged beans for his research to determine how vaccines might be delivered in edible foods.
(You can see one being dipped into sauce, others in the basket at right.) Although they're not true beans or peas, they are also called asparagus peas and winged beans. They taste best when only I to 4 inches long; larger, they develop tough cores.