winnow

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win·now

 (wĭn′ō)
v. win·nowed, win·now·ing, win·nows
v.tr.
1. To separate the chaff from (grain) by means of a current of air.
2. To blow (chaff) off or away.
3. To examine closely in order to separate the good from the bad; sift: The judges winnowed a thousand essays down to six finalists.
4.
a. To separate or get rid of (an undesirable part); eliminate: winnowing out the errors in logic.
b. To sort or select (a desirable part); extract: The investigators winnowed the facts from the testimony.
5. To blow on; fan: a breeze winnowing the tall grass.
v.intr.
1. To separate grain from chaff.
2. To separate the good from the bad.
n.
1. A device for winnowing grain.
2. An act of winnowing.

[Middle English winnewen, alteration of windwen, from Old English windwian, from wind, wind; see wind1.]

win′now·er n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

winnow

(ˈwɪnəʊ)
vb
1. (Agriculture) to separate (grain) from (chaff) by means of a wind or current of air
2. (tr) to examine in order to select the desirable elements
3. (Zoology) (tr) archaic to beat (the air) with wings
4. (tr) rare to blow upon; fan
n
(Agriculture)
a. a device for winnowing
b. the act or process of winnowing
[Old English windwian; related to Old High German wintōn, Gothic diswinthjan, Latin ventilāre. See wind1]
ˈwinnower n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

win•now

(ˈwɪn oʊ)

v.t.
1. to free (grain) of chaff by fanning with wind or a forced current of air.
2. to drive or blow (chaff, dirt, etc.) away by fanning.
3. to blow upon; fan.
4. to subject to some process of separating or distinguishing; analyze critically; sift: to winnow a mass of statements.
5. to separate or distinguish (valuable from worthless parts) (sometimes fol. by out): to winnow fact from fiction.
v.i.
6. to free grain from chaff by wind or driven air.
n.
7. a device used for winnowing.
8. an act of winnowing.
[before 900; Middle English win(d)wen (v.), Old English windwian, derivative of wind wind1]
win′now•er, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

winnow


Past participle: winnowed
Gerund: winnowing

Imperative
winnow
winnow
Present
I winnow
you winnow
he/she/it winnows
we winnow
you winnow
they winnow
Preterite
I winnowed
you winnowed
he/she/it winnowed
we winnowed
you winnowed
they winnowed
Present Continuous
I am winnowing
you are winnowing
he/she/it is winnowing
we are winnowing
you are winnowing
they are winnowing
Present Perfect
I have winnowed
you have winnowed
he/she/it has winnowed
we have winnowed
you have winnowed
they have winnowed
Past Continuous
I was winnowing
you were winnowing
he/she/it was winnowing
we were winnowing
you were winnowing
they were winnowing
Past Perfect
I had winnowed
you had winnowed
he/she/it had winnowed
we had winnowed
you had winnowed
they had winnowed
Future
I will winnow
you will winnow
he/she/it will winnow
we will winnow
you will winnow
they will winnow
Future Perfect
I will have winnowed
you will have winnowed
he/she/it will have winnowed
we will have winnowed
you will have winnowed
they will have winnowed
Future Continuous
I will be winnowing
you will be winnowing
he/she/it will be winnowing
we will be winnowing
you will be winnowing
they will be winnowing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been winnowing
you have been winnowing
he/she/it has been winnowing
we have been winnowing
you have been winnowing
they have been winnowing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been winnowing
you will have been winnowing
he/she/it will have been winnowing
we will have been winnowing
you will have been winnowing
they will have been winnowing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been winnowing
you had been winnowing
he/she/it had been winnowing
we had been winnowing
you had been winnowing
they had been winnowing
Conditional
I would winnow
you would winnow
he/she/it would winnow
we would winnow
you would winnow
they would winnow
Past Conditional
I would have winnowed
you would have winnowed
he/she/it would have winnowed
we would have winnowed
you would have winnowed
they would have winnowed
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011

Winnow

To clean grain by throwing it, shovelful by shovelful, against the wind.
1001 Words and Phrases You Never Knew You Didn’t Know by W.R. Runyan Copyright © 2011 by W.R. Runyan
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.winnow - the act of separating grain from chaffwinnow - the act of separating grain from chaff; "the winnowing was done by women"
separation - sorting one thing from others; "the separation of wheat from chaff"; "the separation of mail by postal zones"
Verb1.winnow - separate the chaff from by using air currents; "She stood there winnowing chaff all day in the field"
sift, sieve, strain - separate by passing through a sieve or other straining device to separate out coarser elements; "sift the flour"
2.winnow - blow on; "The wind was winnowing her hair"; "the wind winnowed the grass"
fan - agitate the air
3.winnow - select desirable parts from a group or list; "cull out the interesting letters from the poet's correspondence"; "winnow the finalists from the long list of applicants"
choose, pick out, select, take - pick out, select, or choose from a number of alternatives; "Take any one of these cards"; "Choose a good husband for your daughter"; "She selected a pair of shoes from among the dozen the salesgirl had shown her"
4.winnow - blow away or off with a current of air; "winnow chaff"
remove, take away, withdraw, take - remove something concrete, as by lifting, pushing, or taking off, or remove something abstract; "remove a threat"; "remove a wrapper"; "Remove the dirty dishes from the table"; "take the gun from your pocket"; "This machine withdraws heat from the environment"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

winnow

verb separate, fan, divide, sift a device which winnows wheat, separating the chaff from the seed
winnow something or someone out separate, part, screen, select, divide, sort out, comb, sift, cull Most of the faulty products were winnowed out by these processes.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

winnow

verb
1. To set apart (one kind or type) from others:
2. To be in a state of motion, as air:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
يُذَرّي، يُغَرْبِل
rostál
hreinsa hismi úr korni meî blæstri
vėtyti
vētīt
previať
harman/tahıl savurmak

winnow

[ˈwɪnəʊ] VTaventar
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

winnow

vt
(fig liter)sichten
(also winnow out) (= remove)aussortieren; (= identify, find out)herausfinden
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

winnow

[ˈwɪnəʊ] vt (grain) → vagliare, mondare
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

winnow

(ˈwinəu) verb
to separate the chaff from (the grain) by wind.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
And then it will be on to Soldier Field, where Tafoya and mates were winnowers to the world for Cody Parkey's rough double-doinker against Philadelphia last January.
For instance, the Ministry of Agriculture has introduced rice threshers and winnowers through various cooperatives, using imported models.
Parers selected an answer and looked for outside verification while Winnowers preferred to be given a set of possible responses that they then evaluated in order to select the "best" choice.
They became skilled threshers and winnowers of grain and brought their familiar rootdigging sticks with them to work in the fields.
In the late 1960s, high-speed PVC cylindrical pipes with a felt rubbing on them (to produce static electricity) were mounted on the conveyor belts of winnowers and sifting machines to remove stalk and fiber more efficiently.