wisewoman


Also found in: Acronyms.

wisewoman

(ˈwaɪzˌwʊmən)
n, pl -women
1. a female magician or conjurer
2. (Alternative Belief Systems) a witch
References in periodicals archive ?
"The Effect of the Missouri WISEWOMAN Program on Control of Hypertension, Hypercholesterolemia, and Elevated Blood Glucose among Low-Income Women." Preventing Chronic Disease 11:E74.
Will, "Racial/ethnic disparities in coronary heart disease risk factors among WISEWOMAN enrollees," Journal of Women's Health, vol.
Obesity and associated coronary heart disease risk factors in a population of low-income African American and white women: North Carolina WISEWOMAN program.
The Nebraska WISEWOMAN findings showed women having higher baseline percentages of total cholesterol ([greater than or equal to] 200 mg/dL), smoking, and diagnosis of diabetes (> 50%, 26%, and 10%, respectively) than women in this study.
The Well-Integrated Screening and Evaluation for Women Across the Nation (WISEWOMAN) program, administered through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention, is a heart disease and stroke risk reduction program developed for this population.
CASSANDRA: Being a Wisewoman is just a different slant on the other things I do as a nurse and counsellor.
"Leslie Marmon Silko: A Literary Companion" is an analytic guide to the writings of Leslie Marmon Silko, "celebrated novelist, poet, memorist and Native American wisewoman." It is accessible to both the lay reader and the professional or graduate literary researcher in content.
(2009) Perceived barriers to physical activity according to stage of change and body mass index in the west Virginia wisewoman population.
Participants can also become eligible for the Wisewoman Screening Program at Village Health, which provides a family medical history, blood pressure screening, a Body Mass Index test, cholesterol and glucose testing, and review by Village Health's medical staff.
It is funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and includes a special project entitled the Welt- Integrated Screening and Evaluation for Women Across the Nation (WISEWOMAN).
Warner re-invents Shakespeare's Sycorax as a Carib wisewoman and transforms Caliban and Ariel into Sycorax's adopted children.
(18.) Khavjou OA et al., A captive audience: bringing the WISEWOMAN program to South Dakota prisoners, Women's Health Issues, 2007, 17(4):193-201.