wisteria

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Related to wisterias: Japanese Wisteria

wis·ter·i·a

 (wĭ-stîr′ē-ə) also wis·tar·i·a (wĭ-stâr′-)
n.
Any of several climbing woody vines of the genus Wisteria in the pea family, having pinnately compound leaves and drooping racemes of showy purplish or white flowers.

[New Latin Wisteria, genus name, after Caspar Wistar (1761-1818), American physician.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

wisteria

(wɪˈstɪərɪə) or

wistaria

n
(Plants) any twining leguminous woody climbing plant of the genus Wisteria, of E Asia and North America, having blue, purple, or white flowers in large drooping clusters
[C19: from New Latin, named after Caspar Wistar (1761–1818), American anatomist]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

wis•te•ri•a

(wɪˈstɪər i ə)

also wis•tar•i•a

(-ˈstɪər-, -ˈstɛər-)

n., pl. -te•ri•as or -tar•i•as.
any climbing shrub of the genus Wisteria, of the legume family, with pendent flower clusters in white, pale purple, or pink.
[< New Latin Wistaria (1818), after Caspar Wistar (1761–1818), U.S. anatomist]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wisteria - any flowering vine of the genus Wisteriawisteria - any flowering vine of the genus Wisteria
genus Wisteria - Asiatic deciduous woody vine having large drooping racemes of white or bluish or purple or pinkish flowers and velvety pods; widely grown as an ornamental
Japanese wistaria, Wisteria floribunda - having flowers of pink to mauve or violet-blue
Chinese wistaria, Wisteria chinensis - having deep purple flowers
American wistaria, American wisteria, Wisteria frutescens - an eastern United States native resembling the cultivated Japanese wisteria having pale purple-lilac flowers
silky wisteria, Wisteria venusta - a wisteria of China having white flowers
vine - a plant with a weak stem that derives support from climbing, twining, or creeping along a surface
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
visteri

wisteria

[wɪsˈtɪərɪə] Nglicina f, vistaria f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

wisteria

[wɪˈstɪəriə] nglycine f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

wisteria

nGlyzinie f, → Wistarie f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

wisteria

[wɪsˈtɪərɪə] nglicine m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Methinks there's a genius Roams in the mountains, Girdled with ivy And robed in wisteria, Lips ever smiling, Of noble demeanour, Driving the yellow pard, Tiger-attended, Couched in a chariot With banners of cassia, Cloaked with the orchid, And crowned with azaleas; Culling the perfume Of sweet flowers, he leaves In the heart a dream-blossom, Memory haunting.
The Countess Olenska had said "after five"; and at half after the hour Newland Archer rang the bell of the peeling stucco house with a giant wisteria throttling its feeble cast-iron balcony, which she had hired, far down West Twenty-third Street, from the vagabond Medora.
Strong support As wisterias are not self-clinging, they will need something to twine around - so provide it with some decent support.
Remember not to let wisterias grow too tall or you will have your work cut out pruning and training them.
Wisterias, however, are even better grown on arches and pergolas where the picturesque twining habit is seen to best advantage, the racemes cascading to their full length in profusion beneath the emerging foliage.
There are about six species of wisterias, the most popular being wisteria floribunda, the Japanese wisteria, and wisteria sinensis, the Chinese wisteria.
Any of these wisterias can reach 9m (28ft) or more in height if left to their own devices and do not need to be pruned if being allowed to grow into trees.
Over the years I've seen some outstanding specimen wisterias throughout the Sunday Mercury area.
Wisterias have a reputation for being difficult or slow to flower which is somewhat unfounded.
You can train these twining woody vines as climbers, ground covers, or trees (tree wisterias are often sold already trained).
That's great you have had some flowers - wisterias can take up to seven years before they show their first bloom.