witchery


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witch

 (wĭch)
n.
1. A person, especially a woman, claiming or popularly believed to possess magical powers and practice sorcery.
2. A believer or follower of Wicca; a Wiccan.
3.
a. Offensive An old woman considered to be ugly or frightening.
b. A woman considered to be spiteful or overbearing.
c. Informal A woman or girl considered to be charming or fascinating.
4. One particularly skilled or competent at one's craft: "A witch of a writer, [she] is capable of developing an intensity that verges on ferocity" (Peter S. Prescott).
v. witched, witch·ing, witch·es
v.tr.
1. To work or cast a spell on; bewitch.
2. To cause, bring, or effect by witchcraft.
v.intr.
To use a divining rod to find underground water or minerals; dowse.

[Middle English wicche, from Old English wicce, witch, and wicca, wizard, sorcerer; see weg- in Indo-European roots.]

witch′er·y (-ə-rē) n.
witch′y adj.

witchery

(ˈwɪtʃərɪ)
n, pl -eries
1. (Alternative Belief Systems) the practice of witchcraft
2. magical or bewitching influence or charm

witch•er•y

(ˈwɪtʃ ə ri)

n., pl. -er•ies.
1. witchcraft; magic.
2. magical influence; fascination; charm.
[1540–50]

witchery

witchcraft or sorcery.
See also: Magic
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.witchery - the art of sorcerywitchery - the art of sorcery      
black art, black magic, necromancy, sorcery - the belief in magical spells that harness occult forces or evil spirits to produce unnatural effects in the world

witchery

noun
1. The use of supernatural powers to influence or predict events:
Translations

witchery

[ˈwɪtʃərɪ] N
1. (lit) → brujería f
2. (fig) → encanto m, magia f

witchery

n (= witchcraft)Hexerei f; (= fascination)Zauber m
References in classic literature ?
But I could not hold out long against the witchery of his verse.
All the mystery and witchery of the night seemed to have gathered there amid the perfumes and the dusky and tortuous outlines of flowers and foliage.
Natasha on the contrary had at once abandoned all her witchery, of which her singing had been an unusually powerful part.
The men and women who live and move in that new world of his creation are as varied as life itself; they are kings and beggars, saints and lovers, great captains, poets, painters, musicians, priests and Popes, Jews, gipsies and dervishes, street-girls, princesses, dancers with the wicked [44] witchery of the daughter of Herodias, wives with the devotion of the wife of Brutus, joyous girls and malevolent grey-beards, statesmen, cavaliers, soldiers of humanity, tyrants and bigots, ancient sages and modern spiritualists, heretics, scholars, scoundrels, devotees, rabbis, persons of quality and men of low estate--men and women as multiform as nature or society has made them.
And this was the tribute paid by the American public to the master who had given to it such tales of conjuring charm, of witchery and mystery as "The Fall of the House of Usher" and "Ligea; such fascinating hoaxes as "The Unparalleled Adventure of Hans Pfaall," "MSS.
It was only that afternoon that May Welland had let him guess that she "cared" (New York's consecrated phrase of maiden avowal), and already his imagination, leaping ahead of the engagement ring, the betrothal kiss and the march from Lohengrin, pictured her at his side in some scene of old European witchery.
A witch I have been, 'tis true, but my witchery was with men.
Some of the effects are very daring, approaching even to the boldest flights of the rococo, the sirocco, and the Byzantine schools--yet the master's hand never falters--it moves on, calm, majestic, confident--and, with that art which conceals art, it finally casts over the TOUT ENSEMBLE, by mysterious methods of its own, a subtle something which refines, subdues, etherealizes the arid components and endures them with the deep charm and gracious witchery of poesy.
Whose sleep hath been taken Beneath the cold moon, As the spell which no slumber Of witchery may test, The rythmical number Which lull'd him to rest ?
The sweetness, the beauty, the witchery of your younger daughter, Colonel Munro, might explain my motives without imputing to me this injustice.
On the present occasion, however, she owed nothing to the witchery of dress, being clad in a riding habit of velvet, which would have appeared stiff and ungraceful on any other form.
A man may be very firm in other matters and yet be under a sort of witchery from a woman.