witchery


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witch

 (wĭch)
n.
1. A person, especially a woman, claiming or popularly believed to possess magical powers and practice sorcery.
2. A believer or follower of Wicca; a Wiccan.
3.
a. Offensive An old woman considered to be ugly or frightening.
b. A woman considered to be spiteful or overbearing.
c. Informal A woman or girl considered to be charming or fascinating.
4. One particularly skilled or competent at one's craft: "A witch of a writer, [she] is capable of developing an intensity that verges on ferocity" (Peter S. Prescott).
v. witched, witch·ing, witch·es
v.tr.
1. To work or cast a spell on; bewitch.
2. To cause, bring, or effect by witchcraft.
v.intr.
To use a divining rod to find underground water or minerals; dowse.

[Middle English wicche, from Old English wicce, witch, and wicca, wizard, sorcerer; see weg- in Indo-European roots.]

witch′er·y (-ə-rē) n.
witch′y adj.

witchery

(ˈwɪtʃərɪ)
n, pl -eries
1. (Alternative Belief Systems) the practice of witchcraft
2. magical or bewitching influence or charm

witch•er•y

(ˈwɪtʃ ə ri)

n., pl. -er•ies.
1. witchcraft; magic.
2. magical influence; fascination; charm.
[1540–50]

witchery

witchcraft or sorcery.
See also: Magic
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.witchery - the art of sorcerywitchery - the art of sorcery      
black art, black magic, necromancy, sorcery - the belief in magical spells that harness occult forces or evil spirits to produce unnatural effects in the world

witchery

noun
1. The use of supernatural powers to influence or predict events:
Translations

witchery

[ˈwɪtʃərɪ] N
1. (lit) → brujería f
2. (fig) → encanto m, magia f

witchery

n (= witchcraft)Hexerei f; (= fascination)Zauber m
References in classic literature ?
All the mystery and witchery of the night seemed to have gathered there amid the perfumes and the dusky and tortuous outlines of flowers and foliage.
The sweetness, the beauty, the witchery of your younger daughter, Colonel Munro, might explain my motives without imputing to me this injustice.
Her presence imparted an indescribable grace and faint witchery to the whole edifice.
Some of the effects are very daring, approaching even to the boldest flights of the rococo, the sirocco, and the Byzantine schools--yet the master's hand never falters--it moves on, calm, majestic, confident--and, with that art which conceals art, it finally casts over the TOUT ENSEMBLE, by mysterious methods of its own, a subtle something which refines, subdues, etherealizes the arid components and endures them with the deep charm and gracious witchery of poesy.
I am influenced--conquered; and the influence is sweeter than I can express; and the conquest I undergo has a witchery beyond any triumph I can win.
On the present occasion, however, she owed nothing to the witchery of dress, being clad in a riding habit of velvet, which would have appeared stiff and ungraceful on any other form.
A man may be very firm in other matters and yet be under a sort of witchery from a woman.
Bertha, the GIRL, was a fascinating secret to me still: I trembled under her touch; I felt the witchery of her presence; I yearned to be assured of her love.
The witchery of the dawn turned the gray river-reaches to purple, gold, and opal; and it was as though the lumbering dhoni crept across the splendours of a new heaven.
No sooner was Guasconti alone in his chamber than the image of Beatrice came back to his passionate musings, invested with all the witchery that had been gathering around it ever since his first glimpse of her, and now likewise imbued with a tender warmth of girlish womanhood.
Whose sleep hath been taken Beneath the cold moon, As the spell which no slumber Of witchery may test, The rythmical number Which lull'd him to rest ?
And this was the tribute paid by the American public to the master who had given to it such tales of conjuring charm, of witchery and mystery as "The Fall of the House of Usher" and "Ligea; such fascinating hoaxes as "The Unparalleled Adventure of Hans Pfaall," "MSS.