with young


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms, Encyclopedia.
Related to with young: Young's modulus, Young Justice

young

 (yŭng)
adj. young·er, young·est
1. Being in an early period of life, development, or growth.
2. Newly begun or formed; not advanced: a young biotech company.
3. Relating to, typical of, or suggestive of youth or early life: He is young for his age.
4. Lacking experience; immature: a young hand at plowing.
5. Being the junior of two people having the same name.
6. Geology Being of an early stage in a geologic cycle. Used of bodies of water and land formations.
n.
1. Young persons considered as a group; youth: entertainment for the young.
2. Offspring; brood: a lioness with her young.
Idiom:
with young
Pregnant. Used of an animal.

[Middle English yong, from Old English geong; see yeu- in Indo-European roots.]

young′ness n.
Synonyms: young, youthful, adolescent, immature, juvenile, childish, puerile, infantile
These adjectives relate to an early stage of growth or development and to its accompanying characteristics. Young is the most general, applying to various periods of life, generally before middle age, as well as to inanimate entities: a young child; a young couple; a young galaxy.
It can suggest a youthful attitude or outlook regardless of chronological age: young at heart.
Youthful suggests the positive characteristics, such as enthusiasm, freshness, or energy, that are traditionally associated with youth: approached the task with youthful ardor.
Adolescent connotes the physical and especially mental or emotional characteristics of those between childhood and maturity; it is generally not disparaging except when used of an adult: adolescent insecurity; an adolescent outburst from the trial lawyer.
Immature is more clearly judgmental, implying that someone falls short of an expected level of mental or emotional development for his or her age: an emotionally immature adult.
Juvenile suggests the immaturity usually associated with adolescents, but it can convey an attitude of tolerance as well as criticism: the juvenile pranks of the conventioneers.
Childish is similar to juvenile but with a younger frame of reference, often suggesting selfishness, stubbornness, or lack of restraint: a committee member with a childish need to have the last word.
However, it can also suggest such positive qualities of children as innocence and wholeheartedness: took childish delight in tending his garden.
Puerile and infantile are used derogatorily to suggest extreme immaturity, especially with regard to social manners: a puerile joke; an infantile boast.
Translations
References in classic literature ?
He had never, as yet, had any relations with young ladies of this category.
And all the parish says Mr Allworthy is so angry with young Mr Jones, that he won't see him.
Young Start funding is aimed at organisations working with young people aged between eight and 24 years of age.
Work is also underway to put forward the pounds 1m funding bid to provide young carer services countywide, with young carers involved in designing the service.
Mark Ashworth, Chief Executive of Young Enterprise West Midlands says: "Partnering with Young Enterprise is far more than an altruistic gesture.
It has been identified as "particularly helpful for doing research with young children who may be unable to communicate any other way" (Greig & Taylor, 1999, p.
From the Top is also connecting with kids in schools through Make Your Own Radio Show Residencies, in partnership with Young Audiences, Inc., and designed with NEC.