withered


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Related to withered: withered away

with·ered

 (wĭth′ərd)
adj.
Shriveled, shrunken, or faded from or as if from loss of moisture or sustenance: "the battle to keep his withered dreams intact" (Time).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.withered - lean and wrinkled by shrinkage as from age or illness; "the old woman's shriveled skin"; "he looked shriveled and ill"; "a shrunken old man"; "a lanky scarecrow of a man with withered face and lantern jaws"-W.F.Starkie; "he did well despite his withered arm"; "a wizened little man with frizzy grey hair"
lean, thin - lacking excess flesh; "you can't be too rich or too thin"; "Yon Cassius has a lean and hungry look"-Shakespeare
2.withered - (used especially of vegetation) having lost all moisture; "dried-up grass"; "the desert was edged with sere vegetation"; "shriveled leaves on the unwatered seedlings"; "withered vines"
botany, flora, vegetation - all the plant life in a particular region or period; "Pleistocene vegetation"; "the flora of southern California"; "the botany of China"
dry - free from liquid or moisture; lacking natural or normal moisture or depleted of water; or no longer wet; "dry land"; "dry clothes"; "a dry climate"; "dry splintery boards"; "a dry river bed"; "the paint is dry"
Translations

withered

[ˈwɪðəd] ADJ [flower, plant] → marchito; [limb] → debilitado, atrofiado

withered

[ˈwɪðərd] adj
[flower] → fané(e); [plant] → flétri(e)
[person, skin, cheeks, hands] → parcheminé(e)
[limb] → atrophié(e)

withered

adj plant, grassverdorrt, vertrocknet; skinverhutzelt, hutzelig; limbverkümmert; a withered old manein verschrumpfter or hutzeliger Alter

withered

[ˈwɪðəd] adj (plant) → appassito/a, vizzo/a; (skin) → avvizzito/a; (limb) → atrofizzato/a
a withered old woman → una vecchietta grinzosa
References in classic literature ?
Ah, lieth everything already withered and grey which but lately stood green and many-hued on this meadow
The healthiest of them resembled, to use an expression of Marryat's, "Hunger's eldest son when he had come of age"; the others were either blind, had withered legs and crept about on their hands, or withered arms and fingerless hands.
But by what perversity of taste had the artist represented his principal figure as so wrinkled and decayed, while yet he had decked her out in the brightest splendor of attire, as if the loveliest maiden had suddenly withered into age, and become a moral to the beautiful around her
It had aged to keep sad company with his own withered features.
Hesiod's diction is in the main Homeric, but one of his charms is the use of quaint allusive phrases derived, perhaps, from a pre- Hesiodic peasant poetry: thus the season when Boreas blows is the time when `the Boneless One gnaws his foot by his fireless hearth in his cheerless house'; to cut one's nails is `to sever the withered from the quick upon that which has five branches'; similarly the burglar is the `day-sleeper', and the serpent is the `hairless one'.
Some of the Mangaboos fell down and had to be dragged from the fire, and all were so withered that it would be necessary to plant them at once.