withers


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Related to withers: withers away

with·ers

 (wĭth′ərz)
pl.n.
The high part of the back of a horse or other quadruped, located between the shoulder blades.

[Possibly from obsolete wither-, against (from the strain exerted on them when a horse draws a load), from Middle English, from Old English; see wi- in Indo-European roots.]

withers

(ˈwɪðəz)
pl n
(Zoology) the highest part of the back of a horse, behind the neck between the shoulders
[C16: short for widersones, from wider with + -sones, perhaps variant of sinew; related to German Widerrist, Old English withre resistance]

with•ers

(ˈwɪð ərz)

n. (used with a pl. v.)
the highest part of the back at the base of the neck of a horse, cow, sheep, etc.
[1535–45; orig. uncertain]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.withers - the highest part of the back at the base of the neck of various animals especially draft animalswithers - the highest part of the back at the base of the neck of various animals especially draft animals
Equus caballus, horse - solid-hoofed herbivorous quadruped domesticated since prehistoric times
ox - an adult castrated bull of the genus Bos; especially Bos taurus
sheep - woolly usually horned ruminant mammal related to the goat
cervid, deer - distinguished from Bovidae by the male's having solid deciduous antlers
body part - any part of an organism such as an organ or extremity
Translations

withers

[ˈwɪðəz] NPLcruz fsing (de caballo)

withers

plWiderrist m

withers

[ˈwɪðəz] nplgarrese msg (di cavallo)
References in classic literature ?
BILL WITHERS, sworn, said: "I was coming along about
Ah, lieth everything already withered and grey which but lately stood green and many-hued on this meadow!
The healthiest of them resembled, to use an expression of Marryat's, "Hunger's eldest son when he had come of age"; the others were either blind, had withered legs and crept about on their hands, or withered arms and fingerless hands.
But by what perversity of taste had the artist represented his principal figure as so wrinkled and decayed, while yet he had decked her out in the brightest splendor of attire, as if the loveliest maiden had suddenly withered into age, and become a moral to the beautiful around her!
If people cannot be assured of graves, I fear they will no longer die, and the best interests of civilisation will wither like a frosted leaf."
It had aged to keep sad company with his own withered features.
It was lean and withered. He lifted both hands to his face.
And every tongue, through utter drought, Was withered at the root; We could not speak, no more than if We had been choked with soot.
Hesiod's diction is in the main Homeric, but one of his charms is the use of quaint allusive phrases derived, perhaps, from a pre- Hesiodic peasant poetry: thus the season when Boreas blows is the time when `the Boneless One gnaws his foot by his fireless hearth in his cheerless house'; to cut one's nails is `to sever the withered from the quick upon that which has five branches'; similarly the burglar is the `day-sleeper', and the serpent is the `hairless one'.
But if any advised you wrongly, the light will wither him."
Their bed of withered oak leaves was strewn upon the small level space, at the foot of a rock, situated near the summit of one of the gentle swells by which the face of the country is there diversified.
Hail to you, sons of Senzangacona, who to-morrow shall be spirits!" and I pointed towards them with my withered hand.