witloof


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wit·loof

 (wĭt′lōf′)
n.
See endive.

[Dutch dialectal : wit, white (from Middle Dutch; see kweit- in Indo-European roots) + loof, leaf (from Middle Dutch).]

witloof

(ˈwɪtləʊf)
n
(Plants) another name for chicory

en•dive

(ˈɛn daɪv, ɑnˈdiv)

n.
1. a composite plant, Cichorium endivia, having a rosette of often curly-edged leaves used in salads.
2. Also called Belgian endive. a young chicory plant deprived of light to form a narrow head of whitish leaves, eaten in salads or cooked.
[1325–75; Middle English < Middle French « Medieval Greek entýbia, pl. of entýbion, derivative of earlier éntybon < Latin intubum,intibum, earlier intubus chicory, endive, perhaps < Semitic]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.witloof - widely cultivated herb with leaves valued as salad greenwitloof - widely cultivated herb with leaves valued as salad green; either curly serrated leaves or broad flat ones that are usually blanched
chicory escarole, escarole, endive - variety of endive having leaves with irregular frilled edges
Belgian endive, French endive, witloof - young broad-leaved endive plant deprived of light to form a narrow whitish head
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
2.witloof - young broad-leaved endive plant deprived of light to form a narrow whitish headwitloof - young broad-leaved endive plant deprived of light to form a narrow whitish head
chicory escarole, escarole, endive - variety of endive having leaves with irregular frilled edges
Cichorium endivia, endive, witloof - widely cultivated herb with leaves valued as salad green; either curly serrated leaves or broad flat ones that are usually blanched
References in periodicals archive ?
They are being cultivated using a traditional forcing method more common on the Continent, where the veg is known as Witloof (White Leaf).
Chicory heads are forced, either underground or in a cool, dark place, which keeps them white - hence their Belgian name Witloof, meaning white leaf.
Organ formation in tissue culture was observed with tobacco tissues [6] Carrot explants ^Nobecourt, [46], Ulmus cambium cultures and Witloof tissue [83].
Hanotel L, Fleuriet A and P Boisseau Biochemical changes involved in browning of gamma-irradiated cut witloof chicory.