witloof


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wit·loof

 (wĭt′lōf′)
n.
See endive.

[Dutch dialectal : wit, white (from Middle Dutch; see kweit- in Indo-European roots) + loof, leaf (from Middle Dutch).]

witloof

(ˈwɪtləʊf)
n
(Plants) another name for chicory

en•dive

(ˈɛn daɪv, ɑnˈdiv)

n.
1. a composite plant, Cichorium endivia, having a rosette of often curly-edged leaves used in salads.
2. Also called Belgian endive. a young chicory plant deprived of light to form a narrow head of whitish leaves, eaten in salads or cooked.
[1325–75; Middle English < Middle French « Medieval Greek entýbia, pl. of entýbion, derivative of earlier éntybon < Latin intubum,intibum, earlier intubus chicory, endive, perhaps < Semitic]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.witloof - widely cultivated herb with leaves valued as salad greenwitloof - widely cultivated herb with leaves valued as salad green; either curly serrated leaves or broad flat ones that are usually blanched
chicory escarole, escarole, endive - variety of endive having leaves with irregular frilled edges
Belgian endive, French endive, witloof - young broad-leaved endive plant deprived of light to form a narrow whitish head
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
2.witloof - young broad-leaved endive plant deprived of light to form a narrow whitish headwitloof - young broad-leaved endive plant deprived of light to form a narrow whitish head
chicory escarole, escarole, endive - variety of endive having leaves with irregular frilled edges
Cichorium endivia, endive, witloof - widely cultivated herb with leaves valued as salad green; either curly serrated leaves or broad flat ones that are usually blanched
References in periodicals archive ?
2007), who reported complimentary effects of TDZ with IAA on shoot regeneration from witloof chicory (Cichorium intybus).
My favorite, though, are the tiny canoes you can make from the little pointed heads of Belgian endive--also known as witloof chicory--rendered white, tender and crisp by blanching.
They are being cultivated using a traditional forcing method more common on the Continent, where the veg is known as Witloof (White Leaf).
Chicory heads are forced, either underground or in a cool, dark place, which keeps them white - hence their Belgian name Witloof, meaning white leaf.
Other delightful food poems in this collection include "Truffles," a poem in five sestets that focus on the links between the truffle and human sexuality; "Endive," a poem celebrating a vegetable with various forms as chicory, escarole, and witloof, inviting the poet to word play; "Composition with Broccoli, #2," which finds a "tableau" of crudites inviting her guests to "compose a world," as the poet does; and "Watermelon," another humorous piece in which the poet imagines swallowing a seed and having "melons" grow from her feet.
Hanotel L, Fleuriet A and P Boisseau Biochemical changes involved in browning of gamma-irradiated cut witloof chicory.